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     GREEN
BUILDING
PRODUCTS AND
MATERIALS
RESOURCE
DIRECTORY
1995

Energy Division, N.C. Department of Commerce
North Carolina Recycling Association
Design Harmony

Supported in part by
The News and Observer Recycling

Printing of this Publication Generously Donated by
The City of Winston-Salem
i


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors and sponsors would like to thank the following persons and
organizations; without their heroic efforts the Green Building Products and
Materials Resource Directory would not have been possible: Kyle Huhtanen, Jim
Robertson, and Chris Thompson. In addition, we would like to thank The News
and Observer Recycling for their sponsorship and those on and associated with the
Green Building Steering Committee: Randy Bowen, Scott Collins, Tricia Grant, Gail
Lindsey, Sean Mulligan, Kay Rogers, Gerry Sutton, Bobbi Tousey and Dan
Woodend.


NOTICE FOR DIRECTORY USERS

The Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory does not make any
subjective assessments about the listed products or the manufacturers or distributors
of those products. Likewise, the authors of the Directory did not subject the listed
products to any scientific testing or analysis. The information that appears with
each product listing was provided by the manufacturer of that product or was
obtained from resource documents. (See "Resources" section).

Due to the rapid change that characterizes the market of building materials, the data
provided in this Directory should be considered only as a starting point for any
material investigation and selection, not as a complete, up-to-date listing. Users
should seek further information and verification of characteristics and
specifications. The Directory is intended to supplement other material resource
documents for the purpose of making educated product choices; it should by no
means be considered a comprehensive do-it-yourselfer's document. At the end of
the Directory is a list of questions that can serve as a checklist for obtaining
additional information about a product from the manufacturer or distributor.

Any comments, suggestions, or questions would be appreciated. Please contact the
parties at the following addresses:

North Carolina Department of Commerce
Energy Division
430 N. Salisbury Street
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611
(919) 733-2230
Contact: A1 Ebron or David Smith

North Carolina Recycling Association
7330 Chapel Hill Road, Suite 207
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607
Contact: Bobbi Tousey (919) 851-8444



Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
ii

Design Harmony
16 N. Boylan Avenue
Raleigh, North Carolina 27603
Contacts: Gail Lindsey or Cheryl Walker (919)755-0300



DISCLAIMER

This publication is sponsored by the Energy Division, North Carolina Department of
Commerce and the US Department of Energy, with State Energy Conservation
Program funds, in cooperation with the North Carolina Recycling Association.
However, any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed
herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of either the
Energy Division, N.C. Department of Commerce or the US Department of Energy.

The Energy Division, North Carolina Department of Commerce, the North Carolina
Recycling Association, and Design Harmony do not endorse any of the products
listed in the Directory, do not warrant their characteristics or performance, and do
not accept any liability for the use of the products.




@ print4 on recycled paper


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
iii


TABLE CONTENTS
OF
~~~~ ~ ~~~




Acknowledgments and Disclaimer ........................................................ i
A Word on Sustainable Design .............................................................. 1
Introduction .......................................................................................... 2
Overview and Background ................................................... 2
Objectives ............................................................................. 3
How to Use this Directory .................................................... 4
Materials, Products, and Systems......................................................... 5
CONSTRUCTION ........................
GENERAL 11
DIVISION 1
................................................. 14
SITEWORK
DIVISION 2
................................................. 20
CONCRETE
DIVISION 3
MASONRY ................................................. 24
DIVISION 4
METALS ..................................................... 28
DIVISION 5
WOOD AND PLASTICS ................................. 31
DIVISION 6
THERMAL AND MOISTURE PROTECTION ...40
DIVISION 7
WINDOWS AND DOORS ............................. 54
DIVISION 8
FINISHES.................................................... 57
DIVISION 9
............................................... 75
SPECIALTIES
DIVISION 10
EQUIPMENT ............................................... 81
DIVISION 11
FURNISHINGS............................................
DIVISION 12 86
........................... 89
SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION
DIVISION 13
MECHANICAL ............................................. 96
DIVISION 15
ELECTRICITY ............................................... 102
DIVISION 16
Glossary of Terms ................................................................................. 107
Resources Consulted ............................................................................. 113
Useful Sources For Further Information............................................... 115
Suggested Questions for Obtaining Additional Information .................122
Company Index .................................................................................... 123



Greeii Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
A WORD ON SUSTAINABLE DESIGN
The complexity of modern society tends to make the consumer unaware of the
resources that are consumed in supporting his or her lifestyle. That same
complexity makes it difficult for a concerned consumer to make environmentally
wise choices. Even with the appropriate information, environmentally sound
decisions often are difficult because of the numerous considerations and trade-offs
that must be weighed. In addition, cost considerations often, in the end, override
environmental considerations. The idea of 鈥漵ustainability鈥? provides a framework
for making environmentally sound decisions.

The Worldwatch Institute defines 鈥渟ustainable鈥? as 鈥漨eeting present needs without
compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.鈥? The
discipline of 鈥漵ustainable design鈥? attempts to reconcile society鈥檚 need for built
structures with the detrimental effects that those structures may have on the natural
environment. Determining the sustainability of a built structure is a complex
process that can be made manageable through the application of a 鈥淟ife Cycle
Analysis,鈥? in which each component of the structure is evaluated by examining the
environmental impacts that arise from each stage in the existence of that
component and the materials used to produce that component. Those stages are:
raw materials extraction processing; manufacture and packaging; distribution; use or
consumption; and final disposal. (American Institute of Architects, Environmental
Resource Guide). Because all building components produce environmental
impacts, only a thorough analysis enables a consumer to make educated choices that
assure the sustainability of the local and world environments.

Sustainable design can contribute greatly to the overall goal of a sustainable society.
For example, the building industry consumes approximately one-third of the
overall energy and approximately two-thirds of the electrical energy used in the
United States. Therefore environmental advances that reduce the amount of
energy consumed for buildings -- such as energy efficient construction techniques,
the use of recycled products, the use of passive (rather than active) heating, cooling,
and ventilation systems, daylighting, and the use of photovoltaic cells for generating
electricity -- can significantly lower overall energy consumption.

Through the North Carolina Recycling Association鈥檚 Green Building Initiative
(including this Materials Resource Directory, NCRA鈥檚 鈥滸reen Building鈥? project, and
a Technology Transfer Bulletin), the sponsors seek to foster sustainable building
practices and to assist individuals and groups who are attempting to practice
sustainable design. The following section lists the major sustainability goals for the
initiative.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Introduction
2


OVERVIEW AND BACKGROUND

.-
Lower Embodied Energy Measuring embodied energy is a difficult yet vital way to
assess the impact that a building product has on the environment. Embodied
energy, measured in British thermal units (Btus), refers to the amount of energy
used to produce a finished, in-place building component, based on the energy
consumed at each stage of its production and use -- resource extraction, processing,
manufacture, packaging, tyansportation, and installation. Setting aside other
considerations, a building product with lower embodied energy is environmentally
preferable. Recycled or reused building components tend to have lower embodied
energy than components made from virgin materials because less energy is
consumed in preparing a recycled or re-used product for its new use than in
manufacturing a new product.

E n e r q Efficient Otteratk:The structure should require the least possible amount
of non-renewable energy for heating, cooling, ventilating, lighting, maintenance,
and any other operations during its lifetime. Also, the major systems should be
selected for durability in order to reduce the energy intensive process of frequent
replacement of components.

n t Resource Use: The building should use the least possible amount of virgin
or non-renewable resources. To accomplish this goal, use of building materials with
whole or partial recycled content should be maximized, and waste generation
should be minimized. The use of off-site resources, such as municipal water,
should be minimized to the extent possible through the utilization of on-site
resources such as graywater or condensate. Local resources are preferable to non-
local resources.

Healthy Environments : The preservation and creation of healthy environments --
for the occupants of the building, the surrounding area, and the world as a whole --
will be a priority. By identifying how materials affect indoor air quality during and
after installation, discretion can be used in selecting inoffensive materials. Recent
studies (by the Rocky Mountain Institute) suggest that worker health and
productivity have a major positive impact on business economics.

TechnolQgical Advances And Market Develott& : This project will endeavor to
promote technological advances that benefit the environment as well as the
occupants, such as advances in building and product design, construction, building
materials and systems, and recycling and the use of recycled products. The initial
cost of environmentally advanced products and systems may be higher than for less
environmentally-desirable ones, but the energy and resources conserved will often
make them preferable in the long run. The project will also seek to foster the
development of markets for products that further sustainability so that the initial
cost of those products will be reduced.
*?




Green Building Products nnd Mnterials Resource Directory
Introduction 3




OBJECTIVES

The Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory is intended to
promote the practice of sustainable building by providing information on
environmentally friendly products and energy and resource efficient building
materials. Because a sustainability approach favors the use of local resources, the
principal focus is on North Carolina based products and distributors. Our efforts,
however, have included others from the eastern United States. The Directory is
intended to assist in the selection of products that will be used in the NCRA's
"green" headquarters building. The headquarters will function as an educational
facility as well as house NCRA's offices. In addition, the Directory is intended to
enhance the availability of information on environmentally friendly building
products and facilitate the ability of manufacturers, distributors, architects, other
designers, engineers, developers, and building clients to realize the goals of
sustainable design, building, and development.

Due to the relatively short time frame in which this document was produced, it was
impossible to conduct an entirely comprehensive product search. Having published
what we acknowledge is an incomplete version of the Directory, we encourage
manufacturers, distributors, and others who are aware of products that should be
added to contact us so that we can include information about those products in
subsequent editions. A blank product form is included at the end of this document
for that purpose.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Introduction
4


HOW TO USE THIS DIREC~ORY

The Directory is formatted similar to the format used by the Construction
Specifications Institute (CSI) Masterformat Manual of Practice, with its sixteen
divisions of building products. This format has been followed by other resource
guides as well. We employed this format so that users of this Directory could utilize
it in conjunction with other existing product catalogues. The absence of Division 14
is intentional due to the unrelated content with regard to sustainable building.

Within each division the entries are arranged alphabetically with the exception of
Divisions seven and nine which are subdivided into categories before alphabetical
arrangement. The individual entry is explained here, denoting each category and
the goal of information presented.

PRODUCE Brand name or call name for the entry.
DESCRIPTION: A short description explaining the product and its function.
COMPANY The address where the product is manufactured, or in some cases the regional distributor.
COMPOSITION The materials used to fabricate the product.
WASTE PRODUCTS The byproducts or leftover materials created or left over from fabrication.
TESTS: Organizations along with tests performed on displayed product.
RECYCLABILITY IN DESIGN: A 鈥測es鈥? or 鈥漬o鈥? question of whether the product is designed to be
recycled at the end of intended use.
POST-CONSUMER CONTENT: Percentage of material content that has passed through its end-usa e as
a consumer item and has been m v e r e d or diverted from solid waste for the purpose of recycing.
PRE-CONSUMER CONTENT: Percentage of material tontent that was generated during production of a
product and that has been recovered or diverted for the purpose of recycling.
RECYCLED CONTENT: Percentage of total recycled material in product combining post and pre-
consumer content. Some manufacturers prefer to publish only this statistic.
R VALUE Applies to products that provide insulation for the building, indicating a measure of thermal
resistance.
EMBODIED ENERGY The amount of energy to prcduce a hnished product that is consumed at each
dage of a product鈥檚 production from resourceextractionto Installation.
ENERGY EFFICIENCY Applies to products which function to conserveenergy within the built
environment.
DISTRIBUTOR: Enterprise oprating as product distributor and is located closest to Kaleigh, North
Carolina. 鈥淔actory Bred鈥欌?? indicates that products arc distributed directly from manufacturer.
REMARKS: Additional informationabout product.

Because every product does not apply to all categories, the 鈥? N / A symbol (Not
Applicable) has been inserted to convey a complete presentation for the entry. Some
categories are left blank because we were unable to collect the information from
manufacturers. With exposure over the concern for this information, we hope that
future editions will be more complete. The Company Index is alphabetical allowing
the user to quickly find individual products in the Directory.

Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Introduction 5


MATERIALS, PRODUCTS, AND SYSTEMS


Introduction

Three issues are common to almost all of the materials, products, and systems
discussed in this Directory. They are: energy; resource consumption; and healthy
environments. The issues will be discussed here, rather than addressing them
individually in each of the division introductions, avoiding repetition, and
allowing them to be viewed as interrelated rather than independent elements.

Enery

Much environmental degradation caused by humans results from energy
production, including air pollution from power plants, hazards from the disposal of
spent nuclear fuel, destruction of aquatic habitat by hydroelectric reservoirs, and air
pollution from automobiles. The following list briefly describes some significant
environmental impacts and human health risks from energy production.

generation of electricity:

carbon dioxide emissions (from fossil fuel combustion) contributing to
global warming
production of sulfur dioxide and oxides of nitrogen (from fossil fuel
combustion) leading to acid rain
habitat destruction from strip mining, and from natural gas and
petroleum exploration and production
risks associated with the disposal of the byproducts of fossil fuel
combustion (e.g., flyash)
thermal pollution of lakes, rivers, and streams from power plant cooling
water
loss of habitat (aquatic and other) caused by hydroelectric reservoirs
obstruction of migratory fish passage by hydroelectric dams
safety risks associated with nuclear power plants
health hazards associated with the disposal of spent nuclear fuels

combustion of fossil fuels (natural gas, oil, and coal) for heating purposes:

carbon dioxide emissions contributing to global warming
production of sulfur dioxide and oxides of nitrogen leading to acid rain
habitat destruction from strip mining, and from natural gas and
petroleum exploration and production


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Introduction
6

risks associated with the disposal of the byproducts of combustion (e.g.,
flyash)

combustion of fossil fuels for transportation purposes:

carbon dioxide emissions contributing to global warming
production of oxides of nitrogen leading to acid rain
habitat destruction from petroleum exploration and extraction
risks associated with the transportation of petroleum products by land and
sea
release of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), used as gasoline additives.
VOCs are precursors in the formation of ozone, which is one of the
principal components of smog and which poses human health risks and
causes crop damage.

Because so many environmental and human health effects result from the
production of energy, much can be learned about the environmental impacts of a
product simply by examining the energy necessary to produce, transport, and install
it, and the energy required to operate it. These two forms of energy use -- embodied
--
energy and operating energy are discussed below.

The concept of "embodied energy" is used to measure the amount of energy
required to produce a finished, in-place building component, based on the energy
consumed at each stage of its production and use -- extracting resources, processing,
manufacturing, packaging, transportation, and installation. The embodied energy of
a steel gutter, for example, would include all of the following expenditures of
energy: the energy needed to extract the iron ore from the ground; the energy to
transport the ore from the mine to the smelter; the energy needed to operate the
smelter, form the gutter, and apply any treatment or coating; the energy to transport
the gutter from the smelter to the distributor and then to the job site; and the energy
needed to operate the tools used to cut and install the gutter on the building. By
examining the embodied energy of the gutter -- and thereby considering the
environmental and health effects that arise from each expenditure of energy -- one
can begin to get a sense of the environmental and health "costs" of making and
installing a gutter.

The concept of "operating energy" considers the energy consumed in operating a
building product or system. For a residential central air conditioning system, for
example, the concepts of both embodied energy and operating energy are relevant.
The compressor unit, the blower unit, the ductwork and registers all have embodied
energy. In addition, in order to operate the system energy is required. It is worth
noting at this point that approximately 70%of the energy released during the
combustion of fossil fuels for the purpose of generating electricity is "wasted and
never reaches the consumer. About 67% of that energy is lost as waste heat at the


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Introduction 7

power plant (unless captured and put to some other use), and another 3% is lost
during transmission. By considering the embodied energy and the operating energy
of the air conditioning system (over its lifetime or some other fixed period), one can
begin to determine the overall environmental and health costs associated with
choosing that system for use.

Not all environmental and health concerns can be measured, however, by looking
at energy. Two other principal issues, resource consumption and healthy
environments, must be addressed. In the discussion of these two topics, it becomes
apparent that all three issues are intertwined.

Resource Consumption

A major distinction that must be made when evaluating the environmental effects
of resource consumption is between "renewable" resources and "non-renewable"
resources. Coal, used for the production of electricity or as a fuel in various heating
and manufacturing processes, is a non-renewable resource in the sense that the
biologic and geologic processes by which coal was created will not create additional
coal in any time frame that is relevant to human consumption. On the other hand,
wind, used in some locations to generate electricity, is totally renewable in that it is
not consumed by the production of electricity; in fact, there are virtually unlimited
supplies of it at certain locations. -The same renewable/non-renewable distinction
that is applied 'to energy resources can be applied to building products. Vinyl
flooring, for example, is made from polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which is produced
from chlorine feedstock and vinyl chloride monomer, which in turn comes from
ethylene, a petroleum feedstock. Since the biologic and geologic processes that
produced petroleum will not create additional petroleum in any time frame
relevant to human consumption, then petroleum must be considered non-
renewable. Since the concept of "sustainability" embodies the idea of meeting
present needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their
own needs, the consumption of non-renewable resources cannot be considered
sustainable behavior.

A second important concept with respect to resource consumption is that of
recycling; i.e. the recovery and reuse of raw materials. Two notions -- that energy is
consumed in producing an object (embodied energy) ,and that some objects are
made using non-renewable resources -- dictate that we treat already-created
materials, products, and systems as precious commodities. To make new materials,
products, or systems would consume more energy, create more environmental and
health risks, and require the depletion of more non-renewable resources. The
concepts of resource recovery and reuse respect this precious nature of things. A
steel filing cabinet that can be reused saves the consumption of additional iron ore
and other non-renewable resources that would be required to make a new one,
avoids the consumption of energy required to manufacture and ship a new one, and
avoids the expenditure of energy required to dispose of the old one.


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Introduction
8

Healthv Environments

The third major issue common to most of the materials, products, and systems in
this Directory is the creation and maintenance of healthy environments. The term
"environmenY' is used in this Directory in the broadest sense, ranging from the
indoor environment of a single structure to the global environment. The following
list contains some of the principal considerations with respect to environments on
all levels.

indoor environment:

indoor air quality -- adequate supply of fresh air with reduction or
elimination of radon, VOCs, and harmful building materials
toxic substances -- reduction or elimination of noxious chemicals,
pesticides, lead paint, etc.
lighting -- adequate amounts of natural light and visual connection with
the outdoors

site environment:

vegetation -- use of native vegetation, low-input (of fertilizers and
pesticides) landscaping, and integrated pest management
habitat -- preservation and/or enhancement of habitat for indigenous
plant and animal populations
water quality -- control of surface water runoff; protection of groundwater
recharge and quality; protection of wetlands; and protection against the
discharge of pollutants
compatibility with building systems -- landscaping to promote natural
ventilation, reduce heating and cooling costs, facilitate daylighting, and
enhance views from the building

regional environment:

thermal environment -- landscaping to reduce the creation of an urban
"heat island effect
transportation -- site selection, and site and building design that enhances
the ability of building users to utilize transportation methods other than
the private automobile




~




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Introduction 9

national and global environments:
0



resource extraction effects -- consideration of the environmental effects of
raw material extraction, including: loss of tropical and temperate forests
with the accompanied loss of species habitat and diversity and effects on
global climate; pollution and loss of habitat from mining operations and
from the exploration for and extraction of natural gas and oil; and long
term disruptions of local economies
climate change -- consideration of the effects on global climate, such as
global warming created by the release of 鈥済reenhouse gases鈥? like carbon
dioxide and CFCs, and the loss of stratospheric ozone (with the
accompanying ill effects on human, plant, and animal health)
pollution -- consideration of the air, water, noise, and other forms of
pollution from the manufacture and transport of materials, products, and
systems
waste disposal -- consideration of the environmental and human health
effects from the disposal of both hazardous and non-hazardous substances

The reader is encouraged to bear these three issues in mind, as well as their inter-
relatedness, while using this Directory.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Introduction
10

NOTES:




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
General Construction 11


DIVISION GENERAL
CONSTRUCTION
1

BACKGROUND

The use of machines and molds in the
fabrication of building materials has
installed a set of standards for sizes and
lengths. During construction, materials
must be conformed to fit building
dimensions producing unused portions
and scraps. Site management is an important consideration during the construction
phase of a project because its neglect can cause serious environmental impacts.
Careless material use and negligent site treatment are common in the hurried
construction of building projects. The lack of an organized site management plan
results in inefficient use of materials and the lack of a directed path for reusing or
recycling construction wastes.

RESOURCES

building materials
tools and energy to operate


ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

A building designed with regard to standard dimensions for materials
implemented can save considerable material waste.
Heavy machinery can cause significant disturbances to the surrounding animal
and plant environments.
Case studies have shown incorporating reuse can provide significant financial
savings.


HOW TO MAKE THE CONSTRUCTION PHASE MORE ENVIRONMENTAL

Take time to design a site management plan with contractors which allows for
sustainable construction with a minimization of unused waste.
Avoid hurried construction with fast deadlines.
Sort and organize construction waste for possible reuse in later applications.
Where heavy machinery must be used, consider limiting impacted area by
providing easy access.


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
General Construction
12



FUTURE INNOVATIONS

Upcoming laws may mandate more diversion of waste materials from landfill
sites.
Recycling avenues continue to develop for building materials.
Salvaging organizations are becoming more abundant creating more available
sources for reusable materials.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
General Construction 13



PRODUCT SALVAGED BUILDING MATERIALS

COMPOSITION: SALVAGED MATERIALSWHICH
DESCRIPTION SALVAGED BUILDING MATERIALSWHICH
HAVE BEEN TAKEN FROM
CAN BE REUSED IN OTHER PROJECTS
RENOVATED OR
DECONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS
..........................................................................................................................
WASTE PRODUCTS:
BUILDING SUPPLY RECYCLING CENTER NONE
COMPANY:
1609 D LAKEWOOD AVE.
DURHAM NC 27707 TESTS:
(919) 490-0414
FAX




REMARKS SOME PRODUCTS ACTUALLY COMPLY WWH
DISTRIBUTOR: STORE
MORE STRINGENT CODES THAN PRESENT
ONES AND OFFER A BETTER MATERIAL




SALVAGED BUILDING MATERIALS
PRODUCT:
COMPOSITION VARIOUS BUILDING MATERIALS
BARGAIN CENTER SELLING RECLAIMED
DESCRIPTIC WHICH ARE APPLICABLE FOR
BUILDING MATERIALS DIRECTED
REUSE
TOWARD REUSE
..... ......... ................... .i i i
~




WASTE PRODUCTS
HABITAT FOR HUMANITY NONE
COMPANY:
2004 YONKERS ROAD
RALEIGH NC 276044258 TESTS
(919) 833-3j99
FAX: (919) 833-8256




REMARKS A STORE WHICH ALLOWS LEFTOVER AND
DISTRIBUTOR: STORE
SALVAGED MATERIALS FROM HABITATTO BE
REUSED




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Sitework
14


DIVISION SITEWORK
2


BACKGROUND

The building of structures has always been
accompanied by some amount of
surrounding sitework, to connect the
structure to and integrate it with the earth.
For most of human history, an awareness
of the relationship between site design,
interior comfort, and health was the
guiding force of any structure. For
example, native Americans in what is now
the southwestern United States had an
understanding of site selection and design,
creating communities on south facing cliffs
to take advantage of the southem solar exposure, with protection from the
elements and thermal massing in the other directions. Unfortunately, modern
construction has largely forgotten the beneficial uses of site orientation and site
design to provide comfortable interior climates. The desire for green lawns,
mechanical rows of bushes, and buildings all facing the street regardless of
orientation accompanied by orderly sidewalks and driveways -- all with little regard
for the effects on indoor climate and comfort -- has dominated site design.

RESOURCES

water
soil
fertilizer
chemicals
pesticides
compost

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Some types of landscaping require significant amounts of fertilizers and
pesticides, which have negative impacts on species diversity, surface water and
groundwater quality, and human health.
Properly located trees and shrubs can lower cooling and heating loads on a
building鈥檚 mechanical systems.

-
Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Sitework 15

An urban landscape without vegetation contributes to the urban heat island
effect.
Earthwork and earth-sheltering can provide thermal benefits to interior
environments.
The use of compost can boost nutrient content, reducing or eliminating need for
artificial fertilizers.

WAYS TO CREATE AN ENVIRONMENTAL LANDSCAPE

Limit the portion of the yard devoted to grass. Most grasses require large
amounts of water, significant applications of pesticides and fertilizers, and do not
provide as good a surface for recharging groundwater resources as more natural
landscapes.
Use native species for landscaping. They are more hardy, require less fertilizer
and pesticides, and are usually drought resistant.
Use natural, organic fertilizers and integrated pest management.
Create a compost pile as a source of mulch and soil enrichers.
Include mulched areas in the landscape to facilitate groundwater recharge.
Incorporate sources for organic foods into the landscape.
When planting trees and shrubs, select types and locations that will facilitate
advantageous solar exposure and limit unwanted solar exposures, and will
facilitate heating, cooling, and ventilation of the building.
Limit impervious cover.
Use drip irrigation which is more efficient than spray irrigation systems.
Implement an irrigation system that uses graywater or collected rainwater, rather
than potable water.
Mitigate radon and protect against moisture before beginning construction below
ground.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

The use of graywater for landscape irrigation is likely to become more accepted as
information about its usefulness becomes more available and building codes are
changed.
The cost of potable water is likely to rise, spurring the popularity of low-input
landscapes and the use of alternative water sources.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Sitework
16



PRODUC J: ENKADRAIN

COMPOSITION HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE
DESCRIPTION SUBSURFACE DRAINAGE MAlTING USED
WOVEN MAT
TO DRAIN WATER FROM FOUNDATION


COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
PO BOX 7249
TESTS: -
NC ASTM D3776,04533, D4833,
28802
D4751, D4491
FAX: (704) 665-5009




REMARKS. INSTALLEDOVER THE ENTIRE BELOW O R A M
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
AREA, THE ENKA DRAIN PROVIDES FOR SUB
SURFACE DRAINAGE THROUGH WOVEN
MAlTING




PRODUC J: MULCH

WOOD WASTE PACKAGEDAS
COMPOSITION:
WOOD WASTE USED AS MULCH
DESCRIPTION: PLANT MULCH

.........I.. .. ....,...... .. ..,,. ,.., .,., ...................................................
,
i. 1,~




I
~ ~ ~ ~




I CONWED FIBERS
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS: NONE
I POBOX652
CATAWBA NC 286134852 JES JS:



.. ..... ...




DIS TRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS:




Green Building Products mid Materials Resource Directory
Sitework 17



STORM WATER DRAINAGE PIPES
PRODUC J:
COMPOSIJION: HDPE CORROSIVE FREE PLASTIC
CURROGATED PLASTIC PIPE IN RANGING
DESCRIPTION:
WIDTHS USED IN TRANSPORTING STORM
WATER DRAINAGE

PE PLASTIC BAGS
WASJE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY:

28382
NC TES JS: ASTM F405




REMARKS A RECYCLED ALTERNATIVE WHICH CAN BE
DISTRIBUTOR: LOCAL SUPPLY COMPANY
USED IN CURVED APPLICATIONS BECAUSE OF
irs FLEXIBILITY




PRODUCT: OUTDOOR ACCESSORIES

COMPOSITION: POLYSTYRENE,
DESCRIPTION: FURNITUREAND PLAYGROUND
POLYPROPYLENE, LOW DENSITY
EQUIPMENT MADE FROM PLASTIC
LUMBER POLYETHYLENE, AND HIGH
DENSITY POLY ETHYLENE MIXED
1 WASTE PRODUCTS:
i PO BOX 5937
! STATESVILLE NC 28687 JES JS:
2 (704) 878-2582 (800) 653-2748




REMARKS FABRICATEDIN A VARIETY OF SIZES AND
DISTRIBUTOR FACTORY DIRECT
COLORS]




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Sitework
18



PRODUCT: MULCH

COMPOSlTlON. RECOVERED WOOD PALLETS
MULCH COMPOSED OF GROUND WOOD
DESCRlPTlON
AND OTHER SALVAGEDWOOD
FROM SALVAGED WOOD PRODUCTS
.,............... ............. .. ..................,.............
.. .... ...... ... ......,.. .,. .......................
,, ,
COMPANY; WASTE PRODUCTS:
PHOENIX RECYCLING NONE
t PO BOX 3865
NC 27895 JESTS:




REMARKS; PLANT IS IN HAVELOCK, N.C. AND HAS BEEN
DISTRIEUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
OPERATING FOR THREE MONTHS




PRODUCT: SEPTIC PIPE SYSTEM

COMPOSITION: FRACTION MELT HIGH DENSITY
RIGID PLASTIC PIPING USED SEPTIC
DESCRIP TlON;
POLYETHYLENE
TANK DRAINPIPE SVTEMS



j WASTE PRODUCTS; PAPER LABEL RESIDUE

i ROSEBORO NC 28382 TESJS' ASTM F405, F 667 AASHTO M
: (919) 525-5121 252. M 294




DISTRIBUTOR. CAROLINA BUILDERS INC REMARKS. STANDARD LIMIT RECYCLED RESINS FOR
CURROGATED PLASTIC PIPE, CUSTOMERS
PO BOX 40599
SHOULD SPECIFICALLYREQUEST PRODUCT
RALEIGH NC 27629 WITH RECYCLED CONTENT




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Sitework 19




PLANT AND PET CARE PRODUCTS
PRODUCT:
COMPOSI JION: BIODEGRADEABLE INGREDIENTS
DESCRIPTION; PRODUCTS PROTECTINGPLANTS AND
PETS MADE FROM NATURAL AND
BIOOEGRADEABLEMATERIALS

WAS JE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY:

TESTS:
(800)447-2229




REMARKS: SOLD AT SOME LOCAL STORES OR CAN BE
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
ORDEREDTHROUGHCATALOG




PRODUCT: PLASTIC RECYCLING CONTAINERS

COMPOSI JION: HDPE RECYCLED PLASTIC
DESCRIPTION: BLOWN PLASTIC CONTAINER FROM
RECYCLED MATERIAL


WASTE PRODUCTS: NONE

27320
NC JES JS: ASTM TESTED
(800)678-2278




DISTRIBUTOR REMARKS ZARN OPERATES ITS OWN RECYCLING PLANT
FACTORY DIRECT
FOR PLASTICS




Green Building Products Mnterinls Resource Directory
ntid
Concrete
20


DIVISION CONCRETE
3

BACKGROUND

Although concrete construction was
developed originally by the Romans and
used extensively in their major building
projects, it fell out of use after the decline of
the Roman Empire and did not reenter the
building world until the 19th century.
Portland cement, invented in England in
1824, initiated the popular use of concrete.
The subsequent technologies of prestressed
and reinforced concrete greatly expanded
the role of concrete in the modern construction world. The flexibility to create
virtually any form imaginable is one of concrete construction鈥檚 more important
attributes.

RESOURCES

various mineral resources (e.g., limestone, silica)
water
energy
wood or metal (for formwork)

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

The mineral resources used to manufacture concrete are generally readily
available, although their extraction generally involves habitat destruction, water
pollution, and air pollution.
Because of the large amounts of energy needed to manufacture cement, concrete
has a high embodied energy.
Concrete is considered a low-toxicity finish material, although consideration
should be given to the toxicity of additivedadmixtures
The high-mass nature of concrete construction makes it a suitable material for
thermal storage in passive solar applications.
The formwork used to place concrete at the construction site often uses large
quantities of wood.
The recycled content and the recyclability of concrete offer opportunities for
resource conservation.

.
Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Concrete 21


WAYS TO USE CONCRETE MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

Because of the large amounts of energy required for its manufacture, be sure to
use concrete efficiently. For example, take advantage of more than just one of its
attributes: suitability as a finish material; thermal storage; and load carrying
capacity.
Use repetitive formwork to avoid excessive consumption of wood forms.
Reuse or recycle excess construction materials and salvaged concrete.
Avoid the use of toxic additives.
Utilize local resources to avoid the energy consumed in transporting heavy
materials long distances.
Designate a cleaning area for tools to limit water use and runoff areas.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

Autoclaved cellular concrete (ACC) uses flyash from the combustion of coal at
0

power plants as a replacement for cement in the manufacturing process. Using
ACC avoids the use of one resource and finds a use for what would otherwise be
a waste. ACC is comparable in strengthand significantly lighter than
conventional concrete systems. Some toxicity concerns have been expressed,
however, because of trace elements found in flyash.
Emerging technologies (e.g., new additives such as sawdust, plastic shreds, fly ash
and new construction methods) can reduce resource consumption.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Concrete
22




PRODUCT: CONCRETE INCORPORATING FLYASH

COMPOSITION: FLYASH FROM COAL-FIRED
DESCRIPTION; CONCRETE SUBSTITUTING FLYASH FOR POWER PLANTS REPLACING UP
THE SILICA IN MAKING CEMENT
TO 20% OF CEMENT CONTENT

WASTE PRODUCTS
CAPITAL CITY READY MIX CONCRETE NONE
COMPANY:
5104 WESTERN BLVD.
RALEIGH NC 27606 TESTS
(919) 233-9955
FAX

..........
..... ,.,


I=--- NOT AVAILABLE
RECYCL46IIUTYINOESIGN:
RVALUE..
'""1 ,.,..
POST-GOASUMERCUNTEN??
NOT AVAILABLE
I"
'" EMBODIEDENERGK
PRE-coNsud(R MNTENTr
ENERGYEFFICENm
RECYCLEOCONTGW:


DISTRIBUTOR; FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS. REQUIRES ABOUT 10% MORE MATERIALTHAN
CONVENTIONAL CEMENT




PRODUCT. AUTOCLAVED CELLULAR CONCRETE

COMPOSITION: FLY ASH, ALUMINUM POWDER,
DESCRIPTION; CONCRETE INTERJECTED WITH
CEMENT, LIME, AND WATER
ALUMINUM SLIVERS
. .......... . ......
................................................. . .., ............................................................ , ,
,
WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY: NORTH AMERICAN CELLULAR CONCRETE NONE
3 REGENCY PLAZA, SUITE #6
TESTS:
PROVIDENCE RI 02903 3 HOUR FIRE RATING
(401) 621-8108




REMARKS A NEW PRODUCT NOT YET ON THE MARKET
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
USINGTHE REACTION OF ALUMINUM POWDER
WITH CEMENT MIX TO FORM A LIGHTER AND
STRONGER CONCRETE.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Concrete 23




PRODUCT. CONCRETE USING FLYASH

COMPOS/T/ON: FLYASH REPLACING UP TO 20%
DESCRIPTION: CONCRETE SUBSTVUTING FLYASH FOR
OF CEMENT CONTENT
THE SILICA IN MAKING CEMENT




1
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
READY MIXED CONCRETE CO. NONE
$ PO BOX 27326



.I
i RALEIGH NC 27611 TESTS:
{ (919) 790-1520
i FAX




REMARKS. REQUIRES ABOUT 10% MORE MATERIAL THAN
D/STR/EUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
CONVENTIONAL CEMENT




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Masonry
24


MASONRY
DIVISION
4

BACKGROUND

Masonry construction dates back at least to
the ancient Egyptians, who used a stone
block unit for constructing the pyramids.
Masonry's modular system allows for ease
of construction and flexibility of building
size and shape. These benefits, along with
the aesthetic effects created by a repetitive
pattern and a textured surface, have made masonry a popular construction system
throughout history and around the world. Originally used in large part because of
its compressive strength, the masonry unit has been supplanted in many structural
applications by more modem materials such as steel and concrete. As a
consequence, masonry units are often used today for cladding applications and as
paving materials, rather than in a load-bearing capacity.

RESOURCES

clay
stone
minerals for grout and mortar
energy

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Masonry resources are generally abundant, although their significant weight
often means that transportation costs dictate the use of locally available
resources. When transported long distances, substantial energy resources are
consumed.
The high-mass nature of masonry construction makes it a good choice when
seeking thermal storage capability for passive solar applications.
Masonry is generally a non-toxic finishing material.
Masonry units often can be reused as a crushed aggregate.
The manufacturing of masonry units requires large amounts of energy, and as a
consequence they have a high embodied energy.
Resource extraction for masonry units can cause environmental impacts
including habitat destruction, air pollution, and polluting runoff.

WAYS TO USE MASONRY MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Masonry 25



In the interest of efficient use of resources, when masonry construction is
selected, try to utilize as many of its inherent traits as possible: thermal storage
potential; endurance; load-bearing capabilities; lack of toxicity; and aesthetic
qualities.
Avoid toxic additives in mortar.
Use salvaged rather than new bricks, especially if the brick is being used only for
cladding. Structural applications of salvaged bricks may require special approval
from code officials.
Look for masonry units containing recycled materials.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

New technologies in reinforcement may allow brick to compete favorably for
structural applications and be utilized in a way that takes advantage of its many
attributes.
Research is progressing in using contaminated soils or sewage sludge, in
combination with clay, as the resource material for brick production. If
successful and found to be safe, this will make productive use of an otherwise
useless resource.
Manufacturers are finding new uses for recycled brick.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Masonry
26




PRODUCT BRICK

COMPOSITION: CLAY, PETROLEUM
DESCRIPTION BRICK MADE FROM PETROLEUM
CONTAMlNATEO SOILS
CONTAMINATEDSOILS
~...~ .,_..,.
.*..~...........
... .,..........,.
..:...,,
,,,,.. ".~
~




CHEROKEE BRICK
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS: NONE
1600 COLON RD.
SANFORD NC 27330 TESTS: ASTM 0 2 1 8
(919) 828-0541 (800) 277-9528
FAX: (919) 834-4563

.. .




DISTRIBUTOR: CHEROKEE SANFORD BRICK REMARKS: KILNS USED IN FIRING BRICKS NOW USE
SAWDUST AS FUEL.
520 BRICKHAVEN DR
RALEIGH NC 27606
(919) 828-0541




PRODUCT. BRICK NUGGETS

DESCRIPTION: COMPOSITION:
NUGGETS USED FOR DECORATIVE CLAY
WALKWAYS AND DRIVEWAYS



I
i CUNNINGHAM BRICK CO. INC.
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
$ ROUTE 2. CUNNINGHAM BRICK RD.


1
THOMASVILLE NC 27360
TESTS:
'i (919)4726181
i FAX




DISTRIBUTOR REMARKS.
FACTORY DIRECT




-
Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Masonry 27



PRODUCT: DURATEXT

DESCRIPTION; COMPOSITION:
WALL VENEER SYSTEMS AND MOLDING GYPSUM, RESIN, RECYCLED
CELLULOSE, WASTE WATER,
FOR INTERIOR OR EXTERIOR
APPLICATIONS NATURAL COLOR

1
..................................... "........,..,.,_...........,...,....................
..,......,..,.....,.........,..i...................
COMPANY: FIBERSTONEQUARRIES INC WASTE PRODUCTS: WASH WATER
I 1112WESTKlNG STREET
FL 32351
TES TS; ASTM TESTED FOR SMOKE AND
FLAME




REMARKS USE OF RECYCLED FIBERS AVOIDS USE OF
DlSTRIBUTOR FACTORY DIRECT
GLASS FILAMENT FIBERS AND MAINTAINSA
BEl-rER ENVIRONMENTFOR WORKERS




Green Building Products nnd Materials Resource Directory
Metals
28


METALS
DIVISION
5

BACKGROUND

After thousands of years with only minor
roles in the building industry, metals have
assumed major structural and non-
structural roles over the last two centuries.
First iron, then steel, led to many
fundamental changes in how metals were
used and how buildings were built. The
abilities of metals to span long distances, to
form high-strength connections, to
function in tension and compression, and
to operate as thin membranes transformed
the building industry. Steel and aluminum
use continues to rise in the construction of
new buildings. Other metals have been
incorporated into the materials recipe to
enhance structural qualities and expand the
role of metals for surface and finish
applications.

RESOURCES

mineral (e.g., bauxite, coal, iron ore)
energy

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Surface mining (for bauxite, iron ore, coal, or other raw materials) consumes
land, destroys habitat, and pollutes air and water.
Because of the large amounts of energy consumed in extracting and transporting
raw materials, and in manufacturing, metal building products have high
embodied energy.
The use of recycled materials in the manufacture of steel and aluminum saves
large quantities of energy when compared to the amount of energy to
manufacture those products using virgin materials.
Metals generally are inert from an indoor air quality point of view, and they may
make it possible to reduce pesticide usage since they are not as attractive to pests
as some of the materials for which they may be substituted.



Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Metals 29


The use of metals in buildings may have human health implications in that they
can create electromagnetic fields.

WAYS TO USE METALS MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

A very high emphasis should be placed on using metal building products
efficiently because of the large amounts of energy used to produce them.
Consider the use of less energy intensive building materials where the
advantageous attributes of metals (e.g., strength and durability) are not needed.
Specify metal building products with recycled content.
Metal building products should be reused if possible, and recycled if they cannot
be reused. Building design should maximize the ability to reuse or recycle when
the building is dismantled.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

Because of the relative ease with which steel can be recovered and recycled, and
the energy savings accrued in using recycled rather than virgin content, the
recycled component of steel building products has been rising and is likely to
continue to rise.
Advances in pollution control in metals manufacturing processes are likely to
continue.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Metals
30



PRODUC T: STEEL FRAMING

COMPOSITION: STEEL STUDS AND BRACING
STEEL STUDS FOR RESIDENTIAL HOUSE
DESCRIPTION;
PIECES
FRAMING
............... .......... ..... ........................... ..............: .......,..... ..................:. ........ ...
I



2 ADVANCED FRAMINGSYSTEMS
COMPANY: NONE THAT CAN'T BE RECYCLED
WASTE PRODUCTS:
1118WSPRING
'; MONROE GA 30655 TESTS:
(BOO) 633-8600
(404) 267-2520
j FAX: (404) 267-2529




DISTRIBUTOR. PRIME SOURCE REMARKS. ALLOWS FOR BIGGER WALL CAVITIES AND
PO BOX I8208 B E l l E R FIRE RATING. INSULATIONVALUES
MUST ACCOUNT FOR THERMAL BRIDGING.
GREENSBORO NC 27419
(9101 294-3400




PRODUC T: 3-D PANEL SYSTEM

COMPOSITION: RECYCLED STEEL, CFC FREE
A LIGHTWEIGHTPANEL CONSISTING OF
DESCRIPTION: POLYSTYRENE, AND SHOTCRETE
AN INSULATING CORE, WIRE MESH, AND
SHOTCRETE
.....
WASTE PRODUCTS.
2610 SIDNEY LANIER DRIVE
GA 31525 HUD: SEE #1120, SBCCI, ICBO,
TESTS:
BOCA.CAB0
(800) 545-3181




REMARKS PROVEN STRUCTURALLY IN HURRICANEAN0
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
EARTHQUAKE CONDITIONS: THE
APPLICATION OF MIS PRODUCT DOES NOT
REQUIRE SKILLED LABOR AND HAS BEEN
IMPLEMENTED BY HABITAT FOR HUMANITY




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Wood and Plastics 31


DIVISION
6 WOOD AND PLASTICS


wood

BACKGROUND

Wood has been one of humans' principle
building materials for thousands of years.
For the vast majority of that period, heavy
timber framing constituted the primary
structural use of wood. This construction
method required skilled laborers who
prepared large wood pieces for placement
with special tools. Light wood framing,
introduced around 1830, revolutionized the
building industry. A small crew of
relatively unskilled laborers could erect the
frame of a small structure in a short period
of time. The dominance of this type of
construction for small structures has led to a huge demand for milled lumber and
has led to the cutting of thousands, if not millions of acres of forest. The relatively
recent development of "manufactured wood products such as plywood,
particleboard, and veneers has created an even greater demand for wood. According
to some estimates, only about 15 percent of the pre-European settlement old growth
forest remains undisturbed in the United States, most of that in Alaska.

RESOURCES

trees
metal for fasteners
chemicals 鈧琽r adhesives and pressure treatment
energy for milling

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

The embodied energy contained in lumber products is lower than that of many
other building materials, although the amount of energy depends upon the
source of the wood and the amount of preparation required to make it suitable
for use.



Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Wood and Plastics
32


Loss of plant and animal species diversity, loss of habitat, and increased runoff
and water pollution are all potential products of logging and deforestation.
Some research suggests that massive deforestation, especially of tropical forests,
could lead to global climate change. Even managed forests have disadvantages as
compared to natural forests, with less species diversity and possible pollution
from pesticide application.
Wood is one of the only major structural building materials that can be derived
from renewable resources.
Most types of wood are non-toxic by themselves, but many products used in
conjunction with wood, su& as paints, stains, sealant, and other treatments, can
have adverse health effects on humans through direct contact or by impacting
indoor air quality. Some of these products also contain volatile organic
compounds.
The manufacture of various wood products can produce significant amounts of
surface and ground water and/or air pollution.

WAYS TO USE WOOD MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

Always attempt to use lumber from certified sustainably managed forests.
Limit the use of treated lumber to those uses where it is absolutely required
because of potential pollution and health problems.
Consider salvaged lumber as a source for building materials, and minimize
waste of lumber at the job site. If using salvaged lumber, be sure to examine for
the presence of lead paint, residual pesticides, and mold or mildew.
Limit the use of wood products that off-gas toxic chemicals and, where they are
necessary, use varieties with the lowest possible emission rates in a manner that
minimizes their negative effect on indoor air quality (e.g., by providing a
ventilation period or by sealing the product).
Utilize new technologies and methods (e.g., wood trusses, manufactured wood
beams, finger jointed wood products) that reduce wood consumption.
Consider the use of heavy timber framing, which can reduce the amount of
wood used, reduce processing, and reduce transportation costs through the use of
local resources.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Wood and Plastics 33

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

Progress is being made in learning about sustainable management of forest
resources and in setting up information systems so that wood consumers can be
sure their lumber comes from such a forest.
Substitutes for conventional framing lumber -- such as recycled wood products,
recycled metal products, plastic products, or combined wood-plastic products --
will continue to be developed.
New technologies and methods are always emerging that will allow humans to
use their wood resources more efficiently in the building industry.


I Plastics
BACKGROUND

Plastics are a relatively recent addition to the building industry. Their flexibility has
allowed them to be used in many different applications. Although they can be
produced from a variety of organic materials, they generally are manufactured from
oil, coal, or natural gas. The durability and longevity of plastics is an asset in certain
applications, but is a problem when they are disposed of, particularly after having
been used only for a short term purpose such as packaging.

RESOURCES

oil
coal
natural gas
salt
energy

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Most plastics are manufactured using non-renewable fossil fuels and their
derivatives.
The manufacture of plastics consumes large amounts of energy and can produce
significant amounts of pollution.
The durability of plastics is a problem when disposal is considered, and
significant landfill space is consumed with plastic products.
Many plastic materials may be recycled, although some require more energy to
recycle than others. Recycling plastics generally conserves resources for the
manufacture of new products.



Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Wood and Plastics
34

Although some plastics release toxic gases throughout their product life, most
plastics do not leach, a benefit over other petroleum products

WAYS TO USE PLASTIC MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

Try using plastics that are not petroleum based, such as those from wood
cellulose, resins, gums, and rubber latex.
Try to use plastics only in applications where their attributes -- rot resistance,
durability, easy workability, and light weight -- make them the best choice.
Use types of plastics that can be easily recycled, and use them in a way that
facilitates recycling when their use is completed.
When specifying plastics, consider their effect on indoor air quality.
Consider the necessity and effectiveness of plastic packaging when specifying
products.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

Increases in the price of petroleum and the other fossil fuels used in the
manufacturing of plastics will heighten the desirability of producing plastics
using renewable organic materials.
Increasing scarcity and expense of the petrochemical resources used to make
plastic is likely to fuel the development of new recycling technologies.
Applications for recycled plastic products, such as recycled plastic "lumber," are
likely to increase as research advances and as building codes are modified.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Wood and Plastics 35



PRODUCT: PLASTIC LUMBER

COMPOSITION: COMBINED RECYCLED PLASTICS
DESCRIPTION: ALTERNATIVE WOOD FOR NON
STRUCTURALAPPLICATIONS


WASTEPRODUCTS: NONE
PO BOX 5937
STATESVILLE NC 28687 TESTS:



...




REMARKS. ALTHOUGH THEY SPECIALIZE IN PRODUCTS.
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
THEY HAVE LUMBER AVAILABLE FOR CUSTOM
DESIGN




PRODUCT: SALVAGED WOOD

COMPOSITION: ANTIQUE HEART PINE
SALVAGED HEART PINE RECOVERED
DESCRIP TION:
FROM RIVER BEDS


1
...,. .... ......., ..... . ........
.. . ...
:i WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY; VERY LITTLE
GOODWIN HEART PINE CO.
'j RT2BOX119-A
MICANOPY FL 32667 TESTS




REMARKS: RIVER RECOVERED HEART PINE WHICH CAN
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
BE USED IN MANY INTERIOR APPLICATIONS




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
36 Wood and Plastics




PRODUCT: BEAM AND LOG FRAMING

COMPOSITION' RECOVERED HEART PINE AND
SUPPLIER OF RECLAIMED HEART PINE
DESCRIPTION: DOUGLAS FIR LOGS
FOR EXPOSED BEAM, LOG, &
CONVENTIONAL HOME CONSTRUCTION
............. ~




COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
HARMONY EXCHANGE WOOD SCRAPS
2 ROUTE 2 BOX 843
i BOONE TESTS: -
NC 28607 RECOGNIZEDBY SOUTHERN
i (704) 264-2314 (BOO) 765-9663 BUILDING CODE
$ FAX. (704) 264-4770




DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS.




PRODUCT: WLYWOOD

COMPOSITION: RECYCLED COMINGLED
DESCRIPTION: COMMINGLED PLASTIC LUMBER PLASTICS WHICH ARE BLENDED
TOGETHER

COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCJS: NONE
RT.2 BOX 343
VA 22920 JES JS:
:: (804) 361-1262


.....................




REMARKS. COMPRESSIVE STRENGTHOF 3500 POUNDS
DISJRIBUTOR. FACTORY DIRECT
PER SO. IN. WITH A DENSITY OF 55 6 0
POUNDS PER CU. FT.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Wood and Plastics 37



PRODUCT: TREX WOOD-POLYMER COMPOSITE

DESCRIPTION: COMPOSITION:
PLASTIC LUMBER CONSISTINGOF WOOD RECYCLEDWOOD AND PLASTIC
AND PLASTIC FIBERS BONDED FIBERS
TOGETHER
................................ .... ..................... ...........................................................................


I
$ MOBIL CHEMICAL CO.
COMPANY; WASTE PRODUCTS: NONE
j 800 CONNECTICUTAVE.




I
i CT
NORWALK 06856 TESTS: LIVE LOAD=I00-200 PSF
(800) 289-8739
$ FAX:




DISTRIBUTOR REMARKS RECOMMENDDEFLECTIONCHARTS O U360
F
PLUNKErC WEBSTER
810 CENTER STREET
APEX NC 27502
(919) 362-0813




PRODUCT TIMBERS AND MILLWORK

COMPOSITION WOOD
TIMBERS AND MILLWORK RESAWN FROM
DESCRIP TION
SALVAGED MATERIALS


COMPANY: SAWDUST AND WOOD SLABS
WASTE PRODUCTS:
1755 PIONEER RD.
SHORTSVILLE NY 14548 TESTS'




REMARKS RECLAIMEDTIMBER THAT CAN PROVIDE FOR
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
UNIQUE INTERIOR WOODWORK APPLICATIONS




Greeii Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Wood nnd Plnstics
38



PRODUCT: HEART WOOD PINE

COMPOSITION: ANTIQUE HEART PINE
DESCRIPTION. RECLAIMEDAND HAND CRAFTED
HEARTWOOD PINE MATERIALS
..........................................................................................................
THE JOINERY CO.
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
W BOX 518
TARBORO NC 27886
TESTS:
(919) 823-3306
FAX (919) 823-0818




DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS: BY RECLAIMING HEART PINE, THE JOINERY
COMPANY OFFERS ANTIQUE FLOORING,
CABINETS, AND MILLWORK




PRODUCT THE SILENT FLOOR

COMPOSITION: WOODTHATHAS BEEN
DESCRIPTION: WOOD SPANNING JOIST MADE FROM
SEPARATED INTO LAYERS AND
BONDEDWOOD FIBERS
THEN LAMINATEDWITH AN
::... ..................... >.......... ................................................. .......
...... ............................. ADHESIVE
j
~ ~ ~




TRUS JOIST MACMILLAN
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS: NONE
4275 SHACKLEFORD RD
NORCROSS GA 30093
TESTS:
(404) 923-9997
FAX




DISTRBUTOR REMARKS PRODUCT IS AN ALTERNATIVE TO SAWN CUT
JEFF GOSSLING
LUMBER USING ONEHALFTOONE THIRDOF
I 0 1 0 NORTH MAIN STREET, SUITE B
THE WOOD REQUIRED FOR A CONVENTIONAL
FUQUAY-VARINA NC 27526
FLOOR ~~




(919) 552-3i45
-~


.
Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Wood and Plastics 39



PRODUCT: NAILS

COMPOSITION: RE-MELTED STEEL AND ZINC
FULL LINE OF NAILS FOR ALL
DESCRIPTION:
CONSTRUCTIONAPPLICATIONS


COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS
W.H. MAZE CO. ZINC BYPRODUCT IS RECYCLED
INTO USEFUL MATERIALS SUCH
I 0 0 CHURCH ST.
AS PAINT PIGMENTS
IL
PERU 61354 TESTS.
i (851) 223-8290
1 FAX: (815) 223-7585




DISTRIBUTOR REMARKS
PRIME SOURCE
w BOX 18208
GREENSBORO NC 27419
(910) 294-3400




PRODUCT PLASTIC LUMBER

COMPOSITION: HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE
FOUR TYPES RANGING FROM PURE
DESCR/PT/ON
FROM MILK AND DETERGENT
RECYCLED PLASTICTO FIBER ADDED
BOlTLES
..,...,,. i
~




YEMM AND HART
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS: NONE
RR 1 BOX 173
MO 63655
MARQUAND TESTS: VARIES BETWEEN TYPES
(800) 462-3468
(314) 783-7544
FAX: (314) 783-7544



R E C Y ~ B l i l W t N ~ l G N :[F NIA
R VALUE:
-1
P O B T ~ S U M CONTCNT:
R
NOT AVAILABLE
N- T :
1 EMLWOEDENERQY:
~~~RCQNlE
I'"""
rWCYUE0~lENT: ENERGYEFFICENCY.


REMARKS YEMM AND HART PRODUCES FOUR TYPES:
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
100%PURE RECYCLED PLASTIC CONTENT,
COMMINGLED. HOLLOW, FIBER ADDED




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture Protection
40


DIVISION THERMAL MOISTURE
7 AND PROTECTION

~~




Thermal Protection

BACKGROUND

Thermal insulation is used to make
interior spaces more comfortable and to
reduce the energy needed to heat or cool
them. It functions by inhibiting the passage
of heat from one side of a structure (wall,
roof, or floor) to the other. The use of
thermal insulation materials came into
common use with the advent of modern
structural methods; no longer did the
structural material itself (e.g., load bearing
masonry, heavy timber framing with an
infill of massive material) provide thermal
insulation in the wall. Light wood framing
or steel framing could hold the structure
upright, yet occupied only a small portion
of wall space. Another material was
needed to provide thermal insulation
along the entire wall surface. Today, the most commonly used materials for
thermal insulation are fiberglass, mineral wool, foam, and cellulose. Choices in
thermal insulation are difficult because of the trade-offs between positive and
negative environmental factors. For example, the energy savings accrued through
the use of insulation produce significant environmental benefits and the materials
used in some thermal insulation produce significant negative health and
environmental impacts.

RESOURCES

mineral fibers (e.g., from basalt or iron ore furnace slag, for mineral fiber
insulation)
other mineral products (e.g., sand, for fiberglass insulation)
recycled newsprint (for cellulose insulation)
various petrochemicals (for foam insulation)
various chemicals (added as fire retardants or for other purposes)
energy resources (for manufacture)


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture Protection 41

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Because the production of most forms of energy creates negative environmental
impacts, thermal insulation offers significant environmental benefits by
reducing the amount of energy required to heat or cool a structure.
CFCs, used as blowing or expansion agents in polymeric plastic foam insulation
materials, have been found to cause damage to stratospheric ozone, which has
been linked to increased incidence of cataracts, skin cancer, and depression of the
human immune system.
Some insulation releases volatile organic compounds (VOCs) or fibers during
installation that could be hazardous to human health or the environment.
Cellulose insulation contains low embodied energy and is made from recycled
paper, although certain chemicals used as fire retardants may cause some VOC
emissions.
Most insulation materials end up being landfilled when they are removed from
a structure.

HOW TO INSULATE YOUR BUILDING MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

Use thermal insulation with the highest R-value that is practical for the
application.
Obtain information from the manufacturer or distributor about any effects that
the insulation material may have on indoor air quality.
Obtain from the manufacturer information about the embodied energy in the
insulation material and about any processes used to manufacture the material
(e.g., the use of CFCs as a foaming agent or the amount of waste produced) that
may be harmful to the environment.
Try to use insulation materials that contain recycled content or that use materials
that would otherwise go to waste. For example: cellulose insulation is made
with recycled paper; some insulation is made with scrap cotton from textile
mills; some fiberglass insulation now contain recycled glass; and some mineral
fiber insulation is made with byproducts from steel manufacturing.
, Choose insulation materials and methods that enable the product to be reused or

recycled when it is removed from the building.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

Manufacturers of foam insulation continue to explore ways of producing their
products without the use of foaming agents that damage the earth鈥檚 atmosphere.
HCFCs, developed as a less damaging alternative to CFCs, still cause some
atmospheric damage.
Research is needed to identify and remove barriers to the recycling of insulation
products. An effective infrastructure for collecting salvaged insulation materials


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture Protection
42

does not exist, and separation of recyclable from non-recyclable materials is
difficult.


I Moisture Protection

BACKGROUND

Moisture protection not only assures the comfort of a building's occupants; it also
provides protection for the building itself, lowering maintenance requirements,
protecting building systems, and prolonging the effective life of building materials.
The roof is the most visible form of moisture protection, but walls and floors often
include some form of moisture protection, also.

Humans have used a wide variety of materials for roofs, ranging from thatch, a
lightweight plant material, to heavy slate and tiles. The selection of roofing
configuration and materials is heavily influenced by climate, building style,
availability of resources, and costs. Petroleum products have a number of attributes
that make them particularly suitable for moisture protection, including being
virtually unaffected by water, elastic and flexible, and somewhat self-healing.
Asphalt is used in many roof systems today, whether as the asphalt shingle for
sloped roofs or as an asphalt membrane on flat roofs. Many other petrochemical
composites are being used for flat roof systems as well.

RESOURCES

wood
fossil fuels (oil and coal)
mineral (e.g., clay, limestone, slate)
metal

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

There are trade-offs to consider among factors such as durability and low
maintenance versus embodied energy content. For example, a metal roof may
have high embodied energy (which can be reduced somewhat through the use of
recycled metal), but it can be expected to last longer than many of its alternatives
and thereby conserve resources.
Roofing options vary in their ability to incorporate recovered materials or to be
recycled. Metal roofs often have a high recycled content, and are quite easy to
recycle, whereas asphalt shingles are rarely recycled.
The only significant roofing systems that come from renewable resources are
wood shingles and thatch. Many roofing and moisture protection systems are
made from petrochemicals, which are not renewable.


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture Protection 43

While air emissions from fossil fuel-based moisture protection systems generally
will not influence indoor air quality, they can be a significant source of
environmental pollutants (e.g., asphalt). Care should be taken to assure that off-
gassing from moisture barriers does not adversely affect indoor air quality.

PROVIDING MOISTURE PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTALLY

Consider materials that have high recycled content and that are capable of being
reused or recycled.
Use durable products with low maintenance to cut down on resource
consumption.
Integrate roofing systems with other building systems. For example, a light-
colored roofing system can save energy by reducing the building鈥檚 cooling load,
and can be used in combination with roof-mounted light monitors to facilitate
daylighting.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

Asphalt roofing system manufacturers are working towards incorporating a
higher percentage of recycled content into their systems.
Manufacturers of shingle systems are working towards using materials that are
recycled, tliat otherwise have little use, or that are renewable. One manufacturer,
for example, is making shingles using a combination of cement and wood fiber
from sawmill waste.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture Protection
44



PRODUCT: ENERGY SEAL

COMPOSITION: 78% RECYCLED SLAG FROM
DESCRIPTION: SPRAY-ON INSULATIONUSING IRON STEEL MILLS AND 22% NATIVE
SLAG
ROCK
...................
.....................................................



I WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY NON-FIBERIZEDMATERIAL
AMERICAN ROCKWOOL
.....
....
USED FOR FILL AND BEDDllNQ
PO BOX 880 run r-n 1
SPRINGHOPE NC 27882 ASTM C-764, E136.C-1014 U.L. E-
TESTS:
84
(919) 478-511 1 (800) 334-0394




REMARKS ROCKWOOL WILL NOT ABSORB WATER,
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
DECAY, OR BREAKDOWN




PRODUCT: AMOFOAM

COMPOSIJIOION: EXTRUDED POLYSTRYENE
DESCRIPTION: EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE FOAM PANEL
INSULATION
............... ..........
,:..
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
AMOCO
i 400 NORTHRIDGE RD. SUITE 1000
i ATLANTA ASTM cwa, E Q ~ ,
GA 30350 TESTS:
C272.DI621 ,E84
:I (404) 587-0535 (BOO) 241-4402
? FAX:




DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS:




Green Building Products and Materinls Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture Protection 45




PRODUCT: ACFOAM

COMPOSITION. POLYISOCORE CLOSED CELL
DESCRIPTION: LAMINATED POLYISOCORE CLOSED
FOAM AND FIBER REINFORCED
CELL PANELS
FELT
...........................................................................................................................................

I WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY; ATLAS
'i 2322VALLEY RD.


I
!: MERIDIAN MS 39307-9805 TESTS: UL: 1256,790,263
: (800) 932-2721
5 FAX:




REMARKS: ONLY FACING IS 100% RECYCLED MATERIAL
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT




PRODUC T: INSULATION

COMPOSITION: TEXTILE SCRAPS: 90% COTTON,
COTTON FIBERS AVAILABLE IN BLANKET
DESCRIPTION: 7% POLYESTER, 3% LINEN
OR BLOWN FORM


WASTEPRODUCJS: NONE

GA 30076 JESTS:




REMARKS: SOLD IN BLANKET FORM OR CAN BE BLOWN IN
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture Protection
46




PRODUCT: DENNYFOIL

COMPOSITION: PAPER AND ALUMINUM
VAPOR RETARDER THAT CAN WORK AS
DESCRIPTION:
A PARTNER W m INSULATION
...............................................................................................................................
! DENNY PRODUCTS
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
!
: 7005 WOOWAY OR
i WAC0 TX 78712
: TESTS:
(817) 7784878
FAX:




DISTRIBUTOR: THE LIVING SOURCE REMARKS:
7005 WOODWAY OR W214
WAC0 TX 78792
(817) 7784818




PRODUCT: ARTIFICIAL SLATE

COMPOSITION: FIBER REINFORCEDPRESSED
D鈧琒CR/PT/ON ALTERNATIVE SLATE MATERIAL BASED
CEMENTITIOUSROOFING
ON CEMENT FIBER SHINGLE
SHINGLES

I
...................... ~.....,..~... i .... j..iji ..
, .. , ~ . ....
...................................... j,.
1
~ ~




i E'ERNIT
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:

BLANDON PA 19510-0879 ASTM CLASS "A" FIRE RATING
TESTS:
i (215)926-0100 (800) 233-3155




DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS AN ALTERNATIVE SHINGLE WNTAlNlNG NO
PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; MANUFACTUREDIN
SOUTH AFRICA




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture Protection 47




PRODUC J: FIBER-CEMENT SHINGLES

COMPOSITION: CEMENT SLATE ROOFING
DESCRIPTION; PORTLAND CEMENT, CELLULOSE FIBER
SHINGLES
AND SILICA PANELS


i FIBRECHEMCO.
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
i i1000-1S.COMMERCEBLVO.;POBOX41i3
TESTS:
CHARLOTTE NC 28241 UL CLASS A FIRE RATING
i (704)527-2727 (800) 3466147
i
i FAX




DISTRI6UTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS. MANUFACTUREDIN SOLITH AFRICA




PRODUCT; PHENOSEAL

COMPOSITION: LATEX (VINYL, VINYL-ACRYLIC,
DESCRIPTION. NONTOXIC ADHESIVE CAULK FOR
ACYLIC). PLASTICIZERS
WEATHERPROOFING


SHORT FILLS, OVERFILLS,
WASTE PRODUC JS
OCCASIONAL OFF COLOR
MATERIAL
MA 02038 JESTS ASTM C-834,C920
(800) 343-4963




REMARKS OFF GASSES INCLUDE ESTERS, ESTER-
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
ALCOHOL, GYCOL (PROPYLENE)




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture Protection
48




PRODUCT TUPS STRESS-SKIN PANELS

PANELS: OLD NEWSPRINT
DESCRIPTION: COMPOSITION'
STRUCTURAL ROOFING SPANNING
CORE: ISOCYANURATEFOAM
MATERIAL INCORPORATINGINSULATED
CORE

NONE
WASTE PRODUCTS:

ASTM: 01621,1622, C-209, E-96,
TESTS:
E-I19




REMARKS: CAN BE INSTALLEDOVER BOTH WOOD AND
DISTRISUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
STEEL FRAMES




PRODUCT: AIRXRETE

DESCRIPTION: COMPOSITION:
CEMENTITIOUSFOAM INSULATION MODIFIEDOXYCHLORIDE
CEMENT


I
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
PALMER NONE
$ 10611 OLDANNAWLISRD
$ MD
FREDERICK 21701 TESTS: ASTM E84.81A. C518.76, c951
i (301) 898-7848
; FAX




REMARKS. NON-TOXIC, NON-CORROSIVE, O W R FREE
DISTRI6UTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
INSULATION WHICH PROVIDES FIRE
PROOFING




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture Protection 49



PRODUCT. SEAL

COMPOSITION: ALL NON-TOXIC MATERIALS
DESCRIPTION: LATEX PRIMER-SEALER FOR INTERIOR
AND EXTERIOR APPLICATIONS


:; PALMER
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
1; 10622 OLDANNAPOLIS RD
FREDERICK MD 21701 TESTS: ASTM E-96,
':

$ (301) 898-7848
:: FAX:

. ..




REMARKS: A VAPOR RETARDER. SEALER WHICH I
S
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
APPLIED WITH BRUSH RELEASING NO TOXIC
EMISSIONS




PRODUCT: THERMO-BITE

COMPOSITION. PLASTIC AND METALS
DESCRIPTION: ALUMINIZED FILM BARRIER



i PARSEC
COMPANY: LESS THAN 1%, MINUTE AMOUNl
WASTE PRODUCTS:
OF VOC EMMITED
i 10345 BROCKWOOD RD
DALLAS TX 75238-1679 TESTS: ASTM D 1004, D882,
i (214)341-6700 (800) 527-3454
i FAX (214)553-0983




REMARKS: EFFECTIVE METHOD OF CONTROLLING AIR
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
AND VAPOR LEAKAGE THROUGH THE WALLS




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture Protection
50



PRODUCT: THERMO-BITE TAPE

COMPOSITION: PAPER, ADHESIVE, ALUMINUM
TAPE THAT SEALS WINDOWS CUTTING
DESCRlPTION
DOWN ON AIR INFILTRATION


I
...........................................................................................................................
.: PARSEC WASTE PRODUCTS: RELEASE LINER AND VOC
COMPANY:
i 10345 BROCKWOOO RD
TX 752381679 TESTS: ASTM C236-66, E 288-73, E84-80




REMARKS A TAPE USEDTO PREVENT AIR INFILTRATION
D/STR/BUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
BY SEALING OPENINGS




PRODUCT: VAPO-BRIE

DESCRlPTION COMPOSITION鈥?
CROSS-LAMINATEDFILM SERVING AS AN CROSS-LAMINATEDFILM
INTERIOR OR EXTERIOR VAPOR
RETARDER

1 WASTE PRODUCTS:
10345 BROCKWOOD RD
?
i
1 DALLAS 75238-1679
TX ASTM E-96, D-882,0-781, D 2582
TESTS:
j (800) 527-3454
(214) 341-6700




REMARKS: A TEAR RESISTANT VAPOR RETARDER FOR
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
INTERIOR OR EXTERIOR USE




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture Protection 51




PRODUC J: RETROFLECT PANELS

COMPOSITION; PAPERBOARD, PLASTIC, METALS
DESCRIPTION: DOUBLE-SIDED ALUMINUM PANELS
USED IN WALL AND ROOF INSULATION


i PARSEC
COMPANY; WASTE PRODUCTS: LESSTHAN 1%
10345 BROCKWOOD RD
5 DALLAS TX 75238-1679 TESJS; ASTM TESTED
i (214)341-8700 (800) 527-3454
! FAX: (2141553-0983




REMARKS RETROFLECTPANELS REDUCE THE AMOUNT
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
OF BTU'S THAT ENTER OR LEAVE THE
STRUCTURE.




PRODUC J: RUBR-WALL

DESCRIPJION: COMPOSITION;
NONTOXIC RUBBER MEMBRANE FOR 100% PETROLEUM BASED
WATER PROOFING FOUNDATIONSOR RUBBER
RETAINING WALLS

COMPANY; WASTE PRODUCTS: NONE
1135 WEST PROTAGE
OH 44313
JES JS: ASTM: D412.836, E96. D95,
04299-83. E154,G29-75, D2020


.. . . ......




DIS TRIBUTOR REMARKS EXPERIMENTEDWITH RECYCLED MATERIALS,
RUBR-WALL CAROLINA
BUT FOUND THEY LACKED CONSISTENCY FOR
10207-E CHAPEL HILL ROAD
_
WATERPROOFING, FURTHER RESEARCH IS
MORRISVILLE NC 27560 ONGOING.
(919) 319-1391



<




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Thermal and Moisture .Protection
52



PRODUCT WATERPROOFING SYSTEM

COMPOSITION: WATER BORN ACRYLIC RESIN,
DESCRIP TION; FLEXIBLE ACRYLIC WATERPROOFING
NATRUAL INORGANIC PIGMENTS
AND FILLERS

1
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
SEALOFLEX
i 2516 OSCAR JOHNSON DR.
i CHARLESTON SC 29405 ASTM D-636, E-96,026, D-1104, E-
TESTS:
33O.D-i204.Bl17, E108




DISTRIBUTOR; JGA REMARKS: 63 GRAMSAITER OF HYDROCARBONSARE
RELEASEDDURING INSTALLATION: PRODUCT
2200 COOK DRIVE
DOESN'TNEEDTOBETORNOFFATTHEEND
30340
ATLANTA GA OF ITS LIFE. SIMPLY COVERED OVER,
(800) 7636118 RELElVlNG LANDFILLS




PRODUCT: CELLULOSE

DESCRIPTION: COMPOSITION:
RECLAIMED AND TREATED PAPER NEWSPAPER AND BORIC ACID
AS A FIRE RETARDANT


I
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS: NONE
6057 BOAT ROCK BLVD
{ ATLANTA' OA 30336 TESTS: ASTM C-739, C518, E-84 UL R-
i (404) 344-3590 8606




I"" 3 7 PER INCH
RECYUA6R"v LESffiN
RVALUE:
"'1"
po8T-CONS~RROONTEN??
85 KWHiTON
EM6OQIEO ENERQY:
PRE-COUSlhb?RCONTEMr
-" ' "1
REOrrm CONTENr ENERGYEFFICENCY


REMARKS SOLD IN LOCAL HARDWARE STORES,
DISTRIBUTOR: LOCAL HARDWARE STORE
MOISTURE RESISTANCE GUARENTEED




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Therninl and Moisture Protection 53




PRODUCT INSULATION

COMPOSITION: RECYCLED NEWSPRINT
DESCRIPTION HOUSING INSULATION CONTAINING 84%
POST CONSUMER RECYCLED PRINT
............................................................................., .... ....,. ......,. .......................
,
!i WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY; NONE
SUNCOAST INDUSTRIES MFG.
PO BOX 337
RHONDA NC 28670-0337 TESTS:
(800) 992-2468




REMARKS: SOLD UNDER BRAND NAMES KOOL'N HEAT
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
AND SAB




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Windows and Doors
54


DIVISION WINDOWS AND DOORS
8

BACKGROUND

Every building requires openings in the
envelope to allow for the passage of people
and air which, in addition, bring light into
the interior and allow views to the outside.
Windows and doors almost always
compromise the integrity of the building
envelope, in that they are not usually as
efficient as the surrounding walls for
thermal or moisture protection. Great
strides have been made, however, in
increasing their efficiency. Along with
tighter fits, improvements in materials
have allowed designers to include large areas of windows or doors without
substantially compromising the overall performance or efficiency of the building,
even in the most severe climates. Properly placed and selected windows can even
make a building operate more efficiently, by reducing the load on other building
systems through daylighting (as a substitute for electrical light) and solar heating (as
a substitute for electrical, gas, or other heating).

RESOURCES

glass
aluminum
fiberglass
wood
vinyl
energy

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Proper placement, design, and selection of windows and doors is very important
so that they can integrate with other building systems -- such as lighting, heating,
cooling, and ventilation -- and provide efficient overall operation of the
building.
The wide variety of glazing makes selection extremely important in order to
maximize the desired performance.



Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Windows nnd Doors 55

The increasing scarcity and expense of clear, straight-grained wood has led to the
use of other materials in window construction, including laminated veneer
lumber, finger-jointed wood, vinyl, aluminum, and fiberglass. These other
materials may have some advantages over wood (e.g., durability and low
maintenance) but they may have some disadvantages as well. For example,
aluminum windows have higher embodied energy, and vinyl windows may
have adverse effects on indoor air quality.

WAYS TO USE WINDOWS AND DOORS MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

Select doors and windows whose attributes match the specific application. For
example, windows suitable for a south-facing exposure may not be the best choice
for a north-facing exposure.
A wide array of materials are now used to make windows. Be sure to consider all
variables in making a decision, including: durability, insulative capacity,
maintenance, fire protection, moisture performance, strength and recyclability.
Try to avoid complicated material combinations that will hinder recycling.
Select window and door products capable of working in tandem with other
building systems. For example, use operable windows if that is determined
compatible with the building鈥檚 HVAC system.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

New, high-tech 鈥渟mart鈥? windows have glazing that can change from opaque to
transparent with an electrical charge. Costs currently are relatively high but are
likely to come down.
Developments will continue in areas such as increasing the insulation abilities
of windows and in allowing windows to take advantage of passive solar gain.
The rate at which doors and windows are evolving makes it important for the
builder to stay abreast of new developments and to take advantage of emerging
rating systems.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Windows and Doors
56




PRODUC J: DOORS AND WINDOWS

DESCRlPTlON. COMPOSITION:
FULL LINE OF WINDOW AND DOORS WITH GLASS, WOOD AND METAL
LOW-E OPTION
.............................................
:: ...............................................................

:; MARVIN DOORS AND WINDOWS WOOD DUST, WOOD CHIPS
WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY:
GLASS, ALUMINUM
i: PO BOX I 0 0
MN 56763-9990 JESTS: ASTM, BOCA, SMA FHA AND
(800) 346-5128 AAMATESTED


...........




REMARKS: LOW鈧? OPTION ALLOWS FOR B m E R U-
DISTRIBUTOR: PREMIER MILLWORK
VALUES FOR ADDED ENERGY EFFICIENCY
2500 INTERNATIONALDR
CONCORD NC 28027
(800) 937-3263




PRODUCT: AVANTI, NEWPORT, CITADEL

NON-CHOICE PINE AND LOW CFC
COMPOSITION:
DESCRIPTION: DOORS AND WINDOWS
POLYURETHANE


COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS: NONE
PO BOX 5700



I
j NORCROSS GA 30091-5700
i JESTS: MSDS TESTED
(404) 497-2000
FAX:




DISTRIBUTOR REMARKS SPECIFIC AMOUNT OF RECYCLED OR
PEACHTREEPLANNING CENTER
SALVAGED MATERIAL USED IN DOORS IS NOT
4215 UNIVERSITYDRIVE
KNOWN -
DURHAM NC 27707
(919) 490-8552




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes 57


FINISHES
DIVISION
9


I I
Caruet

BACKGROUND

Carpeting has been used for thousands of
years in both residential and commercial
construction because of its thermal,
acoustic, and design attributes. Until
recently, almost all carpeting was produced
using natural fibers, predominantly wool.
The chemical revolution of the last four
decades has drastically changed that
situation, and now 80% of all carpet fibers
used by U.S. manufacturers are nylon. In
1990, wool fibers represented only about 1%
of all carpet fibers used. While synthetic
fibers offer some advantages over natural
fibers (e.g., lower cost, stain resistance), they
can pose problems with respect to indoor
air quality and pollution in manufacturing,
and they are generally manufactured using
non-renewable resources.

RESOURCES

petrochemicals -- primarily propane,
ethane, and benzene
natural fibers -- primarily cotton and
wool

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

The manufacturing of carpets can generate significant amounts of pollution,
particularly water pollution, including wastewater containing dyes, mordants
(metals used as binding agents), and bleaching and finishing chemicals. Plants
that produce SB latex -- used in backings, adhesives, and binding agents -- can be
sources of toxic air pollution.
The components of carpeting -- carpet, carpet backing, carpet cushion, and
adhesives -- can be major sources of indoor air pollutants, particularly VOCs.
.
Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes
58

Even a carpet that is relatively inert from an off-gassing point of view can serve
as a "sink" and subsequently as a secondary source of indoor air pollutants.
Carpeting generally contains significant embodied energy. Nylon carpeting, for
example, has an embodied energy of 63,500 Btus per pound. Natural fiber
carpeting generally has a significantly lower embodied energy.
Carpets made from recycled materials have entered the market in the last few
years. Also, some carpeting materials are capable of being recycled; those with
blends of several different materials are generally more difficult to recycle.

HOW TO USE CARPETING MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

Carefully select areas where carpet will be used or will not be used. In areas
where dirt is likely to be tracked in, or perhaps in high traffic areas, consider bare
floors since hard surfaces are easier to clean than carpeting.
Investigate the process used to manufacture the carpeting under consideration.
Consider the recycled content and the pollution generated by the manufacturing
process.
Consider the potential impacts on indoor air quality of the carpet, the cushion,
the adhesives, and the maintenance. The natural fibers used in carpets (e.g.,
wool, sisal, sea grass) are themselves largely inert from an indoor air quality
point of view, although care must be taken with respect to the cushion and
adhesives. Also, natural fiber carpets usually must be treated with pesticides,
which can adversely affect indoor air quality. Steps can be taken to mitigate
emissions from carpets; for example, conditioning can lower VOC emissions, or
an airing-out time period after installation.
Use maintenance products that are low in VOCs and non-toxic.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

Significant advances have been made in using recycled products in carpet
manufacture and in recycling existing carpets for future carpet components, and
further advances are likely.
Manufacturers are searching for ways of producing adhesives, backings, and
cushions that are lower in VOCs and other potential air pollutants.


I Resilient Flooring
BACKGROUND

Resilient flooring materials are used to create durable, relatively inexpensive, and
--
attractive floor surfaces. Linoleum made of linseed oil, rosin, and fillers on a jute
or canvas backing -- was first produced in the 1860s in Scotland and was introduced
to the United States in 1872. With the increased abundance of petroleum and

Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes 59

natural gas resources after World War 11, linoleum was largely replaced as a resilient
flooring by vinyl floor products, made principally from petroleum feedstock and
chlorine feedstock. While vinyl products offer the benefits of easy, inexpensive
production and durability, they pose threats to indoor air quality. The positive
attributes of linoleum -- the fact that it is made using renewable resources and poses
little threat to indoor air quality -- has spurred renewed interest in it.

RESOURCES

linoleum
linseed oil
rosin
fillers
jute or canvas backing

vinyl
polyvinyl chloride (PVC) -- made from petroleum feedstock and chlorine
feedstock
plasticizers (petrochemicals)

wood/cork

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

The manufacture of vinyl flooring involves the handling and disposal of several
very toxic chemicals. For example, vinyl chloride monomer (a precursor of PVC)
is a known carcinogen. Vinyl chloride is a priority pollutant under the federal
Clean Water Act, and therefore subject to special conditions.
Linoleum and vinyl flooring both have significant embodied energy: 49,934 Btus
per pound for linoleum and 34,000 Btus per pound for vinyl flooring.
Linoleum is made using renewable resources (and is degradable), whereas vinyl
flooring is made using non-renewable petrochemical resources.
With respect to indoor air quality, linoleum is largely inert while vinyl chloride
produces significant VOC emissions.
Most resilient floorings are durable and low maintenance.
With respect to recycling, efforts are underway to develop post-consumer
recycling of vinyl flooring. No data are available on post-consumer recycling of
linoleum.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes
60

HOW TO USE RESILIENT FLOORING MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

The negative environmental effects of vinyl flooring, both in its manufacture
and its use, suggest that great caution should be exercised in specifying its use.
If using vinyl or linoleum flooring, specify low-emission adhesives.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

Research is underway to find a method of recycling post-consumer vinyl flooring
and to make the manufacture of the product safer environmentally.
Linoleum is likely to grow in popularity due to its benefits -- use of renewable
resources, little impact on indoor air quality, and durability.

~~




Paint
BACKGROUND

Paints have been used for thousands of years for aesthetic purposes as well as to
increase the durability of building materials. The proliferation of chemicals after
World War I1 included the paint industry, where chemicals were added to paints to
facilitate ease of use, prolong durability, and provide other desired attributes. These
chemicals, however, have created environmental problems. The elimination of
lead from U.S. paints in 1978, and more recently the elimination of mercury, have
improved paint from a health point of view. The major hazards from paint now
stem from the regulated toxic chemicals used and created during manufacture as
well as the hazardous chemical pollutants emitted from paint during application
and drying.

RESOURCES

latex paints:
water
solvents (usually glycol)
latex (made from petrochemicals)
pigments
preservatives and fungicides

鈥渘atural鈥? (alternative) paints:
plant resins
plant and ethereal oils
mineral fillers


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes 61


pigments (derived from clay and minerals)

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Conventional latex paints contain VOCs, which are precursors in the formation
of ozone as well as air pollutants hazardous to human health.
Most conventional paints are made using substantial amounts of non-renewable
resources.
Lead paint, present in approximately 74% of pre-1980 private housing, is a well-
documented health hazard.
Paints can prolong the life of building materials, thereby reducing resource
consump tion.
Paints contain substantial embodied energy.
Improper disposal of leftover paints poses a serious environmental threat.
The manufacturing process for paints involves the handling and disposal of
numerous toxic substances.

HOW TO PAINT MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

Recycle leftover paint when a project is finished or use leftovers as primer for
later projects.
Avoid the use of paints with significant VOC content, unless alternatives are
unsuitable. When using paints with VOC emissions, insure proper ventilation
during application and for a reasonable drying period.
Use clean up methods that avoid the improper disposal of painting products or
contaminated materials.
Utilize alternative paint formulations, such as those with low biocides, where
chemical sensitivity may be a problem.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

New paint formulations will continue to enter the market in response to
consumer demand and increased awareness of health and environmental
hazards.
Manufacturers have initiated efforts to market recycled household paints.




Green Buildiiig Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes
62


Ceramic and Quarry Tile

BACKGROUND

Tile has been a popular choice for flooring and other building applications for
thousands of years because of its durability, aesthetic potential, wide variety of
forms, and the ready availability of resources to manufacture it. The low cost and
ease of installation of other flooring products such as linoleum and vinyl products
have somewhat diminished the popularity of tile during the last century. Increased
awareness of the environmental and human health effects of vinyl products,
however, has renewed the appeal of tile products.

RESOURCES

clay
stone
marble
glass
adhesive grout

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Tile products are largely inert from an indoor air quality perspective, both in
their lack of off-gassing and their inability to serve as sinks.
While the mineral resources used to make tile are not renewable, they are in
plentiful supply, in contrast to some floor treatments that are made from non-
renewable, scarce resources.
Tiles are increasingly available in varieties that incorporate substantial recycled
content.
Because of the substantial energy required to manufacture them and the labor-
intensive installation, tile products are relatively high in embodied energy.
Tile products are very durable and require little maintenance, especially if glazed.

HOW TO USE TILE FLOORING MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

Tile鈥檚 high embodied energy and somewhat labor-intensive installation make it
somewhat unsuitable for shorter term applications. Those very qualities as well
as its durability, however, make it a suitable choice for high-traffic, long-term
applications.
Select tile products containing recycled materials, which are becoming more
available.
Avoid adhesive grouts that have toxic additives.


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes 63


Compared to some flooring options, ceramic or quarry tile has relatively high
mass, giving it some ability to serve as thermal storage in passive solar
applications.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

The availability of tile products containing substantial recycled content is likely
to continue increasing.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes
64



FLOOR AN0 WALL SEALERS AN0 PAINTS
PRODUCT
NO PETROLEUMBASED
;ITION:
DESCRIPTION: SEALERS, POLISHES AND WAXES,
CHEMICALS OR OTHER TOXIC
PAINTS AND PRIMERS, CLEANERS ETC.
MATERIALS
FOR THE CHEMICALLY SENSITIVE
..................................................................................................................

' NO HARMFUL EMISSIONS
$ AFM ENTERPRISES, INC.
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
1140STACY COURT
RIVERSIDE CA 92507 MSDS TESTED
TESTS:
(714) 781-6860




DISTRIBUTOR REMARKS MEETS NEEDS OF CHEMICALLY SENSITIVE
EARTHWARES
101 E. WEAVER STREET
CARRBORO NC 27510
(919) 929-7844




PRODUCT: PACIFIC WATERBORNE

COMPOSITION: 40% WATER BASED WITH 60%
DESCRIPTION: HARDWOODFLOOR FINISHES
SOLVENT

............................................................................................................. ............
BONAKEMI
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS NOTOXIC OFF-GASSING
14805 E. MONCRIEFFPLACE
co 80011
AURORA . TESTS ASTM: 164FASTDRYlNG




REMARKS: WATER BASED ALTERNATIVE THAT IS
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
FORMALDEHYDE FREE




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes 65



PRODUCT AQUA FLECK

COMPOSITION: ACRYLIC EMULSION BINDER.
DESCRIPTION: WATER BASED PAINT CONTAINING
INORGANIC PIGMENTS, WATER
COLORFUL FLECKS FOR UNIQUE
STYLING

$ CALIFORNIA PRODUCTS CORPORATION
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS: NONE
5 169 WAVERLY ST.
; CAMBRIDGE MA 02139 TESTS: ASTM: E-84-91A, D-3273-4,
(617) 547-5300 (800) 225-1141 D2486, D4826,0-2794
i FAX (800) 533-6788




DISTRIBUTOR: WATWLI CAROLINA COATINGS REMARKS: PROPYLENE GLYCOL IS OFF-GASSED (A
COMMON FOOD ADDITIVE): A NON-TOXIC
2433 SOUTH BLVD
WATER EASED ALTERNATIVE FOR INTERIOR
CHARLOTTE NC 28203 APPLICATIONS WITH MINIMAL DRYING TIME.
*REFERS TO PACKAGING




PRODUCT: POWERBOND

DESCRlP JION: COMPOSITION:
DRY ADHESIVE CARPET WHICH IS NYLON 6.6 FACE YARN WITH
VINYL COMPOSITE
COMPOSED OF THREE LAYERS INSTEAD
OF SIX OR SEVEN

WASTE PRODUCTS: TRIM WASTE AND YARN WASTE
WHICH ARE REUSEDOR
311 SMITH INDUSTRIAL BLVD.; PO BOX I 4 4
RECYCLED
GA 30722-1447
JESTS: ASTM: 1929-77 MSDS TESTED
(800) 248-2878




DISTRIBUTOR: B R O W CONTRACT CARPET REMARKS- DRY ADHESIVE CARPET PASSING THE GREEN
LABEL IN VOC EMISSI0NS:THE PRODUCTTS
3106 GLEN ROYAL RD.
TOTALLY RECYCLABLEWlTH END USE
RALEIGH NC 27612 POSSIBILITIES BEING DEVELOPED
(919) 787-7097




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66



PRODUCT: WALLBOARD

COMPOSITION: 100% POLYCARBONATE SHEET,
DESCRIPTION: WALLBOARD DESIGNEDFOR HIGH GYPSUM WALLBOARD, AND
IMPACT
ADHESIVE
............................................................................................................................................
WASTE PRODUCTS:
COREGUARD
COMPANY:
203 RIVER TRAIL
BAY CITY 46706
MI TESTS: UL: U495,ONE HOUR ANOTWO
HOUR RATING OPTIONS
(Sl7) 686-3077




REMARKS WORKS WELL IN HOSPITALS, SCHOOLS, AND
CORRECTIONALFACILITIES WHERE WALLS
EXPERIENCE HIGH IMPACT: INTENDED FOR
NONSTRUCNRAL, NON LOADBEARING
APPLICATIONS




PRODUCT' MARMOLEUM

LINSEED OIL. WOOD, CORK, AND
COMPOSITION:
DESCRIPTION; LINOLEUMFLOORING
JUTE

.... ~,..,
................
i


VERY Llll'LE, BUT EVERYTHING
WASTE PRODUCTS,
FORBO IND. INC.
COMPANY:
IS BIODEGRADEABLE
HUMBOLDT IND. PARK PO BOX 667
HAZLETON PA I8201 TESTS: ASTM: 1028. E 4 4 6




D/STR/BUTOR. FORBO INDUSTRIES INC. REMARKS LINOLEUM IS A COMPLETELY NATURAL
MATERIAL BEING COMPLETELY
240 PEACHTREEST. SUITE 484
BIODEGRADEABLE
ATLANTA GA 30303
(800) 241-8508




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes 67



PRODUCT. HYDROCOTE

COMPOSITION; WATER BASED LACQUER THAT
BLACK, WHITE, AND CLEAR WATER
DESCRIPTION: IS NON-TOXIC AND NON-
BASED LACQUERS
FLAMMABLE

i HIGHLAND HARDWARE WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY: NO UNHEALTHY OFF-GASSING
i 1945 N. HIGHLANDAVE.
j ATLANTA GA 30306 TESTS:
(404) 872-4466
$ FAX:




REMARKS AN ALTERNATIVE WATERgASED SEALER
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
THATOFFERS LUSTERS FROM SATIN TO
GLOSS




PRODUCT. EXTERIOR 440

COMPOSITION: OLD NEWSPAPER
DESCRIPTION: STRUCTURAL BOARD W n H
APPLICATIONS IN SHEATHING, SIDING,
SOFFITS. AND PARTITIONS

COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
HOMASOTE CARBON MONOXIDEAND
1 BOX 7240 CARBON DIOXIDE
WESTTRENTON NJ 086284240 TESTS:
(609) 883-3300 (BOO) 257-9491
FAX: (609) 5301584




~~




REMARKS FABRIC COVERED PANELS FOR DECORATIVE
DISTRIBUTOR LOCAL LUMBER SUPPLIER
WALL FINISHING




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes
68



PRODUCT: 4-WAY FLOOR DECKING

COMPOSITION: OLD NEWSPRINT
DESCRIPTION: STRUCTURAL FLOOR DECKING WHICH
CAN DOUBLE AS A CARPET
UNDERLAYMENT
.... .. .... . .,. ..........
......... .,..... . ......,.,.. .... . ..... .... ..., .
.,
,,
,, ,
.
, ,
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
HOMASOTE NONE
PO BOX 7240
WESTTRENTON NJ 08628-0240 TES TS: KODARIS ACCOUSTICALLY
(609) 883-3300 APPROVED, APA. BOCA. SBCC,
ICBO, FHA, CMHC
FAX: (609) 5301584




DISTRIBUTOR: LOCAL LUMBER COMPANY REMARKS VERY APPROPRIATE FOR ACCOUSTICAL
DEADENING BETWEEN FLOORS CONTAINS NO
FORMALDEHYDESOR ASBESTOS




PRODUCT: IMAGE CARPETS

COMPOSITION: WOVEN POLYPROPYLENE AND
DESCRIPTION: CARPET MADE FROM RECYCLEDPASTIC
STYRENE BUTADIENE
BOTTLES
................. ~ ~ . , , ~..... ................................................... ...... ;........
~
.,...~,.~...~..~~.~ )



IMAGE
COMPANY: WASTEPRODUCTS: PVCBASECAPISSOLDTOBE
RECYCLED
1112TURKEY MTN.RD.; POBOX5555
ARMUCHEE GA 30105
TESTS:
(800) 722-2504
FAX:




DIS TRIBUTOR REMARKS EMISSIONS ON CARPET DON'T EXCEED .6MG
SHERWIN-WILLIAMS
PER SQUARE METER PER HOUR
1507FRANKLIN STREET
-
CHAPEL HILL NC 27514
(919) 9684435




Greett Building Products mid Materials Resource Directory
Finishes 69



PRODUCT LATICRETE

COMPOSITION. ALL NON-TOXIC AND NON-
DESCRlPTION GROUTS, SEALANTS, AND ADHESIVES
FLAMMABLE MATERIALS


COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
LATICRETE INT. INC.
i ONE LATICRETEPARK NORTH
BETHANY CT 06525-3498 TESTS: ANSITESTING
? (800) 2434788
$ (203) 393-0010
FAX (203) 3931684




DISTRIBUTOR: RENFROWTILE DISTRIBUTORS REMARKS
1822 SUNNYSIDE DR PO BOX 9388
CHARLOlTE NC 28299-9388
(704) 334-6811




PRODUCT. CARPET

DESCRIPTION: COMPOSITION:
CARPET MADE FROM RECYCLED PLASTIC # I PET (PLASTIC BOTTLES)
FIBERS



1
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
LEE CARPETS FIBER AND CARPET SCRAPS
PO BOX 28027
i GREENSBORO
I
NC 27420 TESTS: ASTM APPROVED
(800) 523-5647
I/ FAX:




REMARKS. ALL VOC'S ARE E M m E D INCLUDING STYRENE
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
AND 4-PHENYLCYCLOHEXENE. EMISSIONS DO
NOT EXCEED .6MGISQ. M PER HOUR




.
Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes
70



PRODUCT HARTEX

COMPOSITION: RECYCLED CARPET FIBERS
DESCRIPTION; 100% RECYCLED CARPET CUSHION
MADE WrrH SYNTHETIC FIBERS


COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS
LEGGET AND PLAlT NONE
i o 0 L E G G m DR
VILLA RlCA GA 30180 TESTS ASTM E-84, E648




REMARKS ALTERNATIVE CARPET PAD WHICH MAKES
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
USE OF OLD CARPETS




PRODUCT. MILK PAINT

COMPOSITION. MILK PROTEIN, LIME, CLAYS,
POWDER PAINT PRODUCT WHICH I
S
DESCRIPTION: AND PIGMENTS
COMBINEDWITII WATER


COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
OLD FASHIONED MILK PAINTCOMPANY NONE
BDX27.2 ,
01450
QORTON MA TESTS:
i (508) 4486336




REMARKS: POWDERED FORM ELIMINATES NEED FOR
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
SOLVENTS AND LOWERS SHIPPING WEIGHT
ANDVOLUME




Green Building Products and Mnterinls Resource Directory
Finishes 71




PRODUCT ARMSTONE

COMPOSITION MARBLE WITH EPOXY BASED
RECYCLED CAST MARBLE FLOOR TILE
DESCRIPTION RESINS


1
COMPANY: PERMA GRAIN PRODUCTS WASTE PRODUCTS: MARBLE CHIPS
:;

:i 13 WEST THIRD STREET
MEDIA PA 19063
,;
TESTS: ASTM C-I028 U L 4 1 0



........ ..




DISTRIBUTOR: CHEROKEE SANFORD BRICK REMARKS. RECYCLEDTILE
520 BRICKHAVENDR.
RALEIGH NC 27513
(919) 828-0541




PRODUC T: RECYCLED PAINTS

COMPOSITION: LATEX PAINT LEFTOVERS
THREE LINES OF PAINT MADE FROM
DESCRIPTION:
HAZARDOUSWASTE COLLECTIONS


COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
216 EDEN ST.: P.O. BOX 1845
NC 28036 TESTS:
2 (704) 896-7300
i FAX




REMARKS: PAINT STILL HAS VOC EMISSIONOF NORMAL
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
LATEX PAINTS




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes
72



PRODUCT: AURO

COMPOSITION: NATURAL RESINS AND PIGMENTS
DESCRIPTION NATURAL VARNISHES, WAXES,
LACQUERS AND PAINTS
................................................................
................................................................. ~




SINAN CO. WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY: ALL NATURAL AND
BIODEGRADEABLEWASTE
PO BOX 857
DAVIS CA 95617-0857 TESJS'
(916) 753-3140
FAX:




REMARKS A PETROLEUM FREE ALTERNATIVE FOR
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
PAINTINGWALLS; BUCKETS CAN BE REUSED




PRODUCT: CLAY TILE

COMPOSITION: POST CONSUMER AND POST
DURABLE TILE MADE WITH RECYCLED
DESCRIPTION: INDUSTRIAL RECYCLED GLASS,
AND NATURAL MATERIALS
CLAY, STAINS, AND PIGMENTS
..........................
. ..................................
l..j
.:

4
~




$
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
STONEWARE NONE

IN 47374 TESTS:




REMARKS A PRODUCTWHICH IS NOT ONLY RECYCLED
DIS JRIWTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
AND RELATIVELY LOW IN EMBODIED ENERGY,
IT IS ALSO EMISSION FREE




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Finishes 73



PRODUCT LIFEMASTER 2000

coMpos/rIoN: WATER REDUCIBLE WITH NO
A LOW BIOCIDE PAINT AVAILABLE IN
DESCRIPTION. ORGANIC SOLVENTS
UNLIMITED COLORS


1
鈥? ......................................... ........................................................................
~




COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
THE GLIDDEN COMPANY
? 925 EUCLID AVE.



I
CLEVELAND OH 44115 EPA REFERENCE TEST METHOD
TESJS:
(800) 221-4100 24,
: FAX:




DISTRIBUTOR REMARKS CONTAINS NO VOCS AND IS VIRTUALLY
SOUTHEASTREGION
ODORLESS IN APPLICATION: INTERIOR AND
1065 GLIDDEN STREETN.E.
EXTERIOR OPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE
ATLANTA GA 30318
(404) 355-4760




PRODUCT: RECYCLED PAINT PRODUCTS

COMPOSITION: LEFTOVER PAINTS AND STAINS
PAINTS CONTAINING UP TO 90% POST
DESCRlP T/ON.
CONSUMER RECYCLED CONTENT
............


I WASTE PRODUCTS:
GREEN PAINT CO. NONE
9 MAIN ST.; PO BOX 430
j MANCHAUG MA 01526 TESTS:
鈥?: (508)476-1992




I鈥?
鈥? NUI
R E 0 ~ 6 U l N l DESIGN:
N
RVALM:
-
[
POST-CONSUMER W E N T :
E ~ Q E N L C R O Y : NOT AVAILABLE
1鈥濃?濃??
PREWL&ERCWNTENT:
R E W CVNTENT: ENERGYEFFICK鈥?
~ NUI


REMARKS: TYPICAL EMISSIONS ASSOCIATEDWITH LATEX
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
AND SOLVENT EASED PAINTS




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Finishes
74




PRODUCT CUSHIONTILES

POLY-VINYL CHLORIDE (PVC)
COMPOSITION:
DESCRIPTION RUBBER CUSHION FLOORING FOR
INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR USE
...................................,........... .....,....,. .,.........................................,.....,... ......,........
,
COMPANY: NONE
WASTE PRODUCTS:
TURTLE PLASTICS
P.O. BOX 2881
HYANNIS MA 02601 ASTM E-648, D-412-87
TESTS:
(508) 420-5981
FAX: (508) 420-5961




DISTRIBIJTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS.




PRODUCT: RECYCLED RUBBER PAVERS

DESCRIPTION: COMPOSITION.
INTERLOCKINGRUBBER PAVER MADE SYNTHETIC RUBBER, ONE HALF
BEING FROM GROUNDT~RES
OF RECYCLED CONTENT


1
........
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
MA NONE
$RRlBOX173
iMARQUAND 83855
MO TESTS: VARIES BETWEEN PAVER
j (800) 462-3488
(314) 783-7544




DISTRIBUTOR REMARKS AVAILABLE IN VARIOUS PATERNS
FACTORY DIRECT




Greeii Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Specialties 75


DIVISION SPECIALTIES
10

BACKGROUND

The water-flushing indoor toilet has been
in residential use for about 70 years,
improving hygiene and increasing
convenience. The indoor toilet, coupled
with modern sewage systems, has allowed
for taller buildings, cleaner streets, and the
convenient and sanitary removal and
treatment of human wastes from the
interior of buildings. Although the toilet
has experienced several design changes over its life, it still accounts for a substantial
amount of residential water consumption. As sources of potable water become
increasingly scarce and expensive, new technologies are reducing the amount of
water used by toilets.

RESOURCES

Water
Ceramic
Rubber
Metal

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Potable water (drinking water) is not an unlimited resource, yet is the primary
resource for most toilet operations.
Piping wears out more quickly with heavier water usage.
A common cause of failure in septic systems is hydrologic overload (too much
water in the system). Water-conserving plumbing fixtures can alleviate the
problem.
Human waste is a nutrient resource that can be converted into a natural
fertilizer.

HOW TO MAKE THE TOILET MORE ENVIRONMENTAL

Some toilets now on the market use one quart or less of water per flush, five
percent of the water consumption of some conventional toilets.



Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Specialties
76

Composting toilets, which use no water at all to operate, not only conserve
precious water resources, but convert human wastes into a resource.
In building renovations, consider retrofitting old toilets and other fixtures with
water conserving ones.
In new construction, consider using a graywater system that utilizes water from
sinks, showers, and washing machines as toilet water or landscaping water. If
local codes do not currently permit the use of graywater, design the plumbing
system to allow it to be added later if the codes change.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

Local building and sanitation codes, many of which now prevent the use of
graywater systems, are likely to become more amenable to their use.
Water-saving toilets are likely to become the norm, as water resources become
more expensive and government regulations take hold.
Composting toilets will continue to experience improvements in design and
become viable choices, especially in areas where sewer connections are
unavailable and conditions are not amenable for septic systems.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Specialties 77




PRODUC T BIOLETTOILET

COMPOSITION: ABS PLASTIC, AND STAINLESS
COMPOSTABLE TOILET SYSTEMWITH
DESCRIPTION. STEEL
VARYING MODELS


:. BIOLET WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY:
DAMONMILL SQUARE
i CONCORD MA 01742 TESTS: NSE APPROVED
;: (508) 369-3959 (800) 524-6538




REMARKS TOILET WORKS TO CREATE A RESOURCE
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
FROM A WASTE PRODUCT




PRODUCT: FIREPLACE MANTELS

COMPOSITION: GYPSUM, RESIN, RECYCLED
MANTLES MADE FROM STONE AND
DESCRIPTION: CELLULOSEFIBERS. WASTE
NATURAL FIBERS
WATER, AND NATURAL COLORS



I WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY: WASH WATER
FIBERSTONEQUARRIES
j 1112WESTKlNGSTREET
!j QUINCY FL 32351 ASTM TESTED FOR SMOKE AND
JESTS:
t (904) 6271083 FLAME
FAX: (904) 627-2640
,:




REMARKS MOLDS USED IN CREATION OF FIBERSTONE
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
ALLOW INTRICATE DESIGNS




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Specialties
78



PRODUCT FIREPLACES AND CHIMNEY SYSTEMS

PUMICE, STONE, WATER,
COMPOSITION:
DESCRIPTION: HIGH DENSITY VOLCANIS AGGREGATE
ALUMINATE CEMENT. FIBER
FIREPLACE SYSTEM


i:ISOKERN VERY LITTLE
COMPANY: WAS JE PRODUCTS:
2 8917 WESTERN WAY, SUITE I 2 0
i
$ JACKSONVILLE FL 32256 U.L. 127,1777,103
TESJS:
$ (904) 363-3417 (800) 642-2920
I FAX: (904) 363-3408




DISTRIBUTOR: ADAMS PRODUCTS REMARKS. FIREPLACE AND CHIMNEY SYSTEMS
FABRICATED WITH RECYCLED MATERIALS
HWY 54 WEST
WHICH REFLECT 80% OF THE HEAT
MORRISVILLE NC 27560 GENERATED INSIDE
(800) 672-3131




PRODUCT CASCADE

COMPOSITION; VITREOUS CHINA
DESCRIPTION. ULTRA LOW FLUSH TOILET



WASTE PRODUCTS:
UMBING PRODUCTS
150 FIRST STREET
TESTS:
PERRYSVILLE 44864 ANSI AND ASME APPROVED
OH




DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS:




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Specialties 79




PRODUCT: MICROPHOR

COMWSITION: VITREOUS CHINA
DESCRIPTION: LOW FLUSH TOILET



I
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
MICROPHOR
5 452 HILL RD.: PO BOX I 4 6 0



I
1 WILLITS CA 95490 TESTS: UNIVERSAL PLUMBING CODE LF-
> 210
(800) 3584280
! FAX (707)459-8617




REMARKS: USES AS FEW AS TWO QUARTS OF WATER PER
DISTRISUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
FLUSH




PRODUCT: TOILET

COMPOSITION: VITREOUS CHINA
DESCRIPTION: LOW FLUSH TOlLEl



1
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS.
UNIVERSAL-RUNDLE
i WBOX29
2 NEW CASTLE PA 16103 TESTS: ANSI TESTING APPROVED
$ (412)6588831
ij FAX:




DISTRIBUTOR REMARKS ONE PIECE TOILET
FACTORY DIRECT




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Specialties
80



PRODUC J: TOILE1

COMPOSITION. VITREOUS CHINA OR
LOW FLUSH AND COMPOSTIBLE TOILETS
DESCRIPJION. THERMOPLASTICS


CARBON DIOXIDE AND WATER
WASTE PRODUCJS

MA 01742 JESTS




REMARKS A COMPOSTABLE TOILET WHICH CAN
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
COLLECT INDIVIDUALLYOR BE BROUGHT TD
A CENTRAL UNIT FOR AEROBIC
DECOMPOSITION




PRODUCT: FLUSHMATE

COMPOSITION: PLASTIC CASING
DESCRIPTION: LOW FLUSH TOILET USING
ACCELERATEDWATER SPEED


COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS
WATER CONTROL INT.
2820-224 WEST MAPLE RD
JESTS
MI ANSI A I 12.19.2, Ai12.19.6, ASSE
TROY 48084
(313)643-8006 (BOO) 533-3460 1037




DISJRI6UJOR REMARKS A PRODUCTPRODUCEDWHICH IS
FERGUSON ENTERPRISES
DISTRIBUTEDTO SEVERAL TOILET
2700 YONKERS RD
MANUFACTURERS
RALEIGH NC 27604
(919) 828-7300




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Equipment 87


EQUIPMENT
DIVISION
11

BACKGROUND

Americans have become very dependent
on appliances for their convenience and
ability to speed up everyday tasks. Because
most residential appliances operate on
electricity, which is generated at remote
locations, humans tend to become unaware
of the amount of energy they consume or
the effects of producing that energy.
Electricity is likely to become more
expensive as the resources used to generate
it become more scarce and as greater
controls are required to address the
pollution created during the process of
generation. Conservation, rather than the
construction of new power plants, is the
least expensive means for creating
additional electrical resources. Increasing
efficiency, therefore, offers a means to more environmentally sound and less
expensive appliances.

PRIMARY RESOURCES USED

Water
Electricity (and the resources used to generate it)

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Increased efficiency of appliances saves money and reduces environmental
impacts.
Recent studies have suggested that normal municipal drinking water may
contain chemicals adverse to human health.
Water from sources other than municipal supplies should be tested thoroughly
for pathogens and chemicals.




*



Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Equipment
82


HOW TO OPERATE APPLIANCES MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

Specify the most efficient appliances appropriate for the task.
Even with efficient appliances, use them in a manner that conserves resources.
For example: operate clothes washers with a full load and use a cold water rinse;
minimize opening and closing the refrigerator; and operate the dishwasher with
a full load and do not use a heated dry cycle.
Side-by-side refrigerators use 15-25% more energy than a refrigerator with the
freezer on top.
Consider installing a graywater system that reuses the water from clothes or dish
washing.
There are several ways to save energy easily when drying clothes: dry one load
right after another to take advantage of residual heat; run the dryer with a full
load (but not overloaded); clean the filter between loads. Dryers with a moisture
sensor control automatically turn off when the clothes are dry, and a "cool-
down" cycle uses cool air to finish drying. Or, use an old-fashioned rack or line
to dry clothes.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

The energy efficiency of equipment in the home is continually improving to
meet federal regulations and rising energy costs.
Water filters are likely to become more common as there is greater awareness of
the health hazards contained in water and as drinking water plants are forced to
use greater amounts of chemicals to make degraded water suitable for drinking.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Equipment 83



PRODUCT DISHWASHER

COMPOS/JION:
LOW ENERGY AND WATER USE
DESCRIPTION
DISHWASHER


ASK0
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
129 WEAVER DAIRY RD
* I
CHAPEL HILL NC 27516 TESTS:
(800) 267-2444
(919) 933-5800
FAX




DISTRIBUTOR. BISHOP'S CUSTOM KITCHENS REMARKS. T H E ONLY ADDRESS GIVEN, BUT PRODUCT IS
MADE IN SWEDEN
1129 WEAVER DAIRY RD.
CHAPEL HILL NC 27516
(919) 933-5800




PRODUCT SEPTIC HELPER

DESCRIPTION COMPOSITION 8 SCIENTIFICALLYENHANCED
PREVENT SEPTIC BACKUP WITH
NATURAL ENZYME CLEANING AGENT BIOSTRAINS


COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS: NONE

LARCHMONT NY 10538-0521
TESTS:
(800) 5444074




REMARKS: USED IN SEPTIC SYSTEMS, PRODUCT
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
UNCLOGS AND PREVENTS CLOGS WITH THE
USE OF ENZYMES TO BREAK W W N WASTE IN
AN ORGANIC PROCESS




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Equipment
84




PRODUCT: WATER FILTERS

COMPOSITION; GRANULAR ACTIVATED
DESCRIPTION: WATER FILTER USING GRANULAR
CARBON FILTER FOR CHLORINE
ACTIVATED CARBON
ABSORPTION

WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY: NSA
I 4260 E. RAINES RD
3
MEMPHIS TN 38118
';
TESTS:
3
i FAX




DISTRIBUTOR: lNMPENDENTDlSTRlWTOR REMARKS: FILTERS MAKE NO GUARANTEE OF REMOVING
HARMFUL CHEMICALS, BUT REMOVE
2122 ENTERPRISE RD
CHLORINE AND IMPROVE TASTE,
GREENSBORO NC 27408 APPEARANCE, A N D O W R
(910) 2718828




PRODUCT RF-12

COMPOSITION: NON CFC REFRIGERATING
DESCRIPTION: ULTRA EFFICIENT REFRIGERATOR
SYSTEM


1
i SUN FROST
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
i POBOX1101

I
ARCATA CA 98521 TESTS:
$ (707) 822-9095
j FAX:
.... . ..




DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS: USES 80% LESS ENERGY THAN
CONVENTIONAL REFRIGERATORS




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Equipment 8.5




PRODUCT SERP

COMPOSITION: NON CFC REFRIGERATING
DESCRIPTION; "GOLDEN CARROT' ENERGY EFFICIENT
SYSTEM
REFRIGERATOR


COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
WHIRLPOOL
: 2000 N O R M STATE ROUTE 63
i BENTON HARBOR MI 49022
TESTS:
! (909) 3944828 (800) 253-1301
i FAX:




DISTRBUTOR. REMARKS M E PREDICTEDENERGY COST FOR ONE YEAR
FACTORY DIRECT
I ABOVTS55
S




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Furnishings
86


DIVISION FURNISHINGS
12

BACKGROUND

During most of human history, the
manufacture of furniture and furnishings
was a small scale enterprise involving the
use of natural materials from local
resources. Natural, untreated fabrics and
wood were the principal components. In a
relatively short period of time, the
manufacture of these products has changed
greatly: it has grown in scale; it draws on
resources from around the globe; and it has
joined other industries in the chemical
revolution. These changes have had
significant environmental impacts.
Furniture production contributes to the
clearing of tropical hardwood forests.
Forty-two million acres of tropical'forest
disappeared in 1990 alone. The increased
use of chemicals in the production of
fumiture and furnishings contributes to air
pollution problems and poses hazards to
indoor air quality. The southeastern U.S., which leads the nation in furniture
production, is particularly affected by the environmental hazards of furniture
production.

RESOURCES

wood
metals
textiles
chemicals
energy

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Furniture and furnishings production are significant sources of emissions of
volatile organic compounds.
The use of tropical hardwoods for furniture and furnishings contributes to the
deforestation of tropical forests.


Green Building Products ahd Materials Resource Directory
Furnishings 87


The use of wood from agriculturally managed forests raises issues of species
monoculture, loss of species diversity, and habitat destruction.
CFCs, sometimes used in the manufacture of foams, may be used in the
production of foam cushions.
Finishes and adhesives used in furniture, and chemicals used to treat fabrics, can
cause degradation of indoor air quality.

STEPS TOWARDS MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY FURNITURE AND
FURNISHINGS

Examine what chemicals were used in the manufacture of furniture and
furnishings, especially VOCs and CFCs.
Exercise caution in selecting certain "natural" furnishings materials such as sisal
or bamboo, because they sometimes are treated with pesticides.
Inquire about potential effects on indoor air quality.
Determine whether the product contains any recycled content and whether it is
recyclable in whole or in part upon completion of its use.
Avoid furniture or furnishings that will not be durable or that will require large
amounts of maintenance, especially if the maintenance will involve the use of
potentially toxic chemicals.
Furniture or furnishings can serve as "sinks" for indoor air pollutants, trapping
the pollutants that come from other sources, then re-releasing them later. In
general, surface textures that are rougher will more readily become sinks; textiles
generally are vulnerable to functioning as sinks.
While furniture material such as metals may be beneficial from an indoor air
quality point of view, they generally contain high embodied energy.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

A trend towards fabrics made with natural (and sometimes even organic), non-
chemically treated fibers has recently emerged.
Recycled components are likely to become more common as a resource for
furniture production. Some furniture companies take back their components
and refurbish them.
Furniture manufacturers are beginning to find methods to produce high quality
furniture, with durable finishes, with no or reduced VOC usage.




+




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Furnishings
88



PRODUC J: BEDSPREADS AND DRAPERIES

COMPOSITION: 100% NATURAL COlTON, NON-
DESCRIPTION: NATURAL COTTON FURNISHING
TOXIC AND CHEMICAL FREE
PRODUCTS
..........................................,......,............... . . ..........................................
,,
HOMESPUN FABRICS & DRAPERIES WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY: NONE
2626 PALMA DR.
VENTURA CA 93003 JESTS:
(805) 642-811 1
FAX 1805) 642-0759




DISJRISUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS: COTTON FABRIC I USED IN PRODUCING
S
SEAMLESS DRAPERIES, WALLCOVERINGS,
UPHOLSTERY, SPREADS, AND CLOTHING




PRODUC J: OPEN PLAN SYSTEMS

DESCRlP JION: COMPOSITION:
REFURBISHEDOFFICE FURNITURE REUSED HARDBOARDCORE AND
PADDING WITH NEW COVERINGS
OR TOPS

WASTE FABRICS ARE USED AS
WASTE PRODUCTS:
PACKAGING MATERIALS
VA 75222 JES JS:
(800) 728-0701




DISTRIB~T~R REMARKS UNIQUE ALTERNATIVE TO INVESTING IN NEW
MODULAR OFFICE DESIGN
OFFICE FURNISHINGS
8204 BROWNLEIGH
.
RALEIGH NC 27612
(919) 847-6588




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Special Construction 89


CONSTRUCTION
DIVISION SPECIAL
13

BACKGROUND

The availability of fossil fuels to heat living
spaces and domestic hot water is a
relatively recent phenomenon.
Nonetheless, humans have quickly become
dependent on those fuels for necessities
such as hot water sterilization and for
comforts like well heated homes or long,
hot showers. While humans need not give
up those necessities or comforts, the
increasing scarcity and cost of fossil fuels, as
well as the environmental impacts that
flow from their extraction and use, will
compel society to turn to renewable sources
for heating energy. Solar power likely will
be one of the principal sources of new
energy.

RESOURCES

solar energy
wind
hydroelectric power
nuclear power
fossil fuels

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Most systems used to heat domestic water or indoor spaces involve the burning
of fossil fuels in one form or another: onsite combustion in the case of oil, coal,
or gas furnaces or gas water heaters; or offsite combustion of oil, coal, or gas to
generate electricity to run a space heating system or a hot water heater. All
combustion of fossil fuels produces carbon dioxide, the primary greenhouse gas
that contributes to global warming, and also produces air pollution and
sometimes other types of pollution. Any reduction in the combustion of fossil
fuels for heating purposes, therefore, produces environmental benefits.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Special Construction
90

WAYS TO USE ALTERNATIVE FUELS EFFICIENTLY

The design of systems that use alternative energy sources (e.g., passive solar or
photovoltaics) must include strategies for both the efficient capture of the energy
as well the effective storage of that energy so that it is available when needed.
The heating of domestic hot water, involving a relatively small temperature
increase, is usually a cost-effective application for solar energy.
Many passive solar heating systems (or other alternative energy systems as well)
require the active and educated participation of the building鈥檚 occupants in order
for the system to perform up to its capability. This participation includes tasks
such as raising or lowering thermal shades or operating air vents. This is not
usually a problem in residential settings, but can be a problem in commercial
settings, where the occupants vary over time. In this situation, an ongoing
education program or 鈥漵mart controls鈥? (such as occupancy sensors or timer
devices) may be necessary.
Recent technological advances have resulted in substantially more efficient
heating appliances. Consider updating older appliances to take advantage of
efficiency gains.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

Photovoltaic cells, harnessing the power of the sun to generate electricity, are
already cost effective in some applications. As the price of utility-generated
electricity increases, as it inevitably will, and the technology of photovoltaics
becomes more sophisticated and more affordable, solar energy is likely to become
a more dominant source for electricity.
Tax incentives at the state level may make solar photovoltaic systems more
economical in commercial, industrial, and residential applications.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Special Construction 91




PRODUCT ENERTIA HOUSES

COMPOSITION WX6鈥? WOOD TIMBERS
KIT HOUSE USING HEAVY TIMBER
DESCRIPTIOW
CONSTRUCTION
,............................. .........................; .......,..,,.,.,..., .. ..........,.,.,....,..,,..,,,,
. :
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
ENERTIA BUILDING SYSTEMS TIMBER SCRAPS
RT. 1 BOX 67
WAKEFOREST NC 27587
TESJS:
(919) 556-0177
FAX:




DISJRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS EASED ON THE LOG CABIN DESIGN, THIS
HOUSE USES A PATENTED DESIGN TO
MAINTAIN INDOOR AIR TEMPERATURE
WITHOUT AN ADDITIONAL MECHANICAL
SYSTEM.




PRODUCT. DOMESTIC SOLAR SYSTEMS

DESCRIPTION: COMPOSITION:
HOT WATER AND HOT AIR SOLAR
SYSTEMS


I WASTE PRODUCTS.
4609 OLD GrrrYSEURG RD.



I
MECHANICSEURG PA 17055 TESTS: SICC TESTING
(717) 761-7757
FAX: (717) 761-2083




.



DISTRIBUTOR. FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Special Construction
92




PRODUCT: STRAW BALE

STRAW
COMPOSITION:
WALL MASS
F
C
DESCRIPTION: USING STRAW BALE

....................,.. ......, ....................................,.. ..............^....... ....,.... ., ......... .........
,
NONE
OUT ON BALE LTD WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY:
1037 E. LINDEN ST.
TUSCON A2 85719 TESTS:
(602) 624-1673
FAX:




REMARKS PROVIDEEDUCATIONAL MATERIAL ON STRAW
DISTRIEUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
BALE CONSTRUCTION




PRODUCT: COPPER CRICKET

COMPOSITION: COPPER. METAL
SOLAR WATER HEATER USING HEAT
DESCRIPTION:
EXCHANGER


WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY; SAGE ADVANCE CORPORATION
$ POBOX23136
i EUGENE OR 97402 TESTS:
$ (503)485-1947
i FAX: 1503)4840657




REMARKS USING PANELS AND A HEAT EXCHANGER, THE
DISTRIEUTOR~ FACTORY DIRECT
SYSTEM USES THE BOILING AND COOLING
ACTION OF THE FLUID TO RUN THE CYCLE




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Special Construction 93



PRODUCT SOLAR WATER HEATERS

COMPOSlJION COPPER, ALUMINUM, GLASS,
DESCRIPTION. SOLAR WATER HEATERS FOR MANY
STAINLESS STEEL,
APPLICATIONS
POLYISOCYANURATE
......................................,.. .........................................,,......................,,..,.....,..,.,,.
1
't SOLAR DEVELOPMENTINC
COMPANY; WASTE PRODUCTS:
:j 3607-APROSPECTAVE.
: RIVERA BEACH 33404
FL
TESTS: ASHRAE 93-97 EFFICIENCY TEST




DISTRISUJOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS: 'POST CONSUMER CONTENT REFERS TO
COPPER, ALUMINUM, AND STEEL
COMPONENTS


*




PRODUCT SOLAR HOT WATER HEATING APPLIANCE

DESCRIPTION COMPOSITION TIMBREX MOUNTING FOR GLASS
MODULAR SOLAR COLLECTOR SYSTEM
TUBES


WASTE PRODUCTS:
817 DIXON BLVD. SUITE 5A
32922
FL
TESTS:




DISTRBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS: JAPANESE PRODUCEDTUBES ARE
ASSEMBLED INTO SOLAR WATER HEATER
SYSTEM: 'REFERS TOTIMBREX IN MOUNTING




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Special Construction
94




PRODUCT: FRESOURCE

COMPOSITION: ALUMINUM, COPPER,
DESCRIPTION: SOLAR WATER HEATER
INSULATION. TEFZEL

...,.. ............,.,. .,,,..,, ..... .. .... .....,.. ............ .,...............
.,,.. .. . ; :
._.,..,.,.....,. ,
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
SUNQUEST MINIMAL
-
1555 RANKLIN AVENUE
i NEWTON TESTS:
28656
NC SOLAR PERFORMANCETESTING




DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS.




PRODUCT: SOLAR EQUIPMENT

COMPOSITION. POLYBUTYLENE PIPING
DESCRIPTION HYDRONICRADIANT FLOOR SYSTEM
USING SOLAR ENERGY FOR HEAT
SOURCE


I
{ WASTE PRODUCTS:
COMPANY: SUNQUEST
1555 RANKLIN AVE.
28658
NC TESTS: ASTM D3309




REMARKS SYSTEM USING SOLAR ENERGY TO PROVIDE
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
HEAT THROUGH FLOORINGSYSTEM




Green Budding Products and Materials Resource Directory
Specinl Construction 95



PRODUCT. INSULATEDPANEL

DESCRIPTION COMPOSITION
ENERGY EFFICIENTINSULATINGPANELS CFC FREE EXPANDED
WLYSNRENE FOAM


COMPANY: WAS JE PRODUCTS
WINTER PANEL CORP HCFC. 15 OZONE FACTOR
i GLEN ORNE DRIVE RR 5 BOX 168B
$ VT 05301
BRATTLEBORD ASTM E72-BO. E 564-76. E695-79.
JESTS
: (802) 2563435 E-84,E IlQ,C518-76




DISTRIWTOR: REMARKS'
FACTORY DIRECT




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Mechanical
96


DIVISION MECHANICAL
15

BACKGROUND

Building environmental control systems
are at least as old as the use of open fires to
heat a cave dwelling. Throughout most of
human history, designers and builders had
to rely on natural systems including wind,
sun, and the heat-storing capacity of high
mass materials such as masonry to obtain
some degree of control over indoor
environments. The advent of the
industrial revolution and the availability of
fossil fuels enabled humans to control their
indoor environments to a greater degree than ever before. As mechanical heating,
cooling, and ventilation systems became more sophisticated, and as combustion
fuels became more available, humans came to rely less on natural systems. In
recent years, some might even argue that mechanical environmental control
systems have taken on an adversarial, rather than cooperative, relationship with
natural systems.

An increased awareness of humankind鈥檚 negative effects on the natural world, and
of the scarcity of resources that had at one time seemed inexhaustible, have led
builders and designers to reconsider the relationship between mechanical systems
and natural systems. Instead of a relationship in which mechanical devices are used
to overcome natural forces, mechanical devices are beginning to be viewed as a
supplement to, and as a means to harness, the beneficial effects of natural
environmental forces.

RESOURCES

solar energy
wind
fossil fuels
renewable fuel sources




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Mechanical 97

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Most mechanical HVAC systems involve the burning of fossil fuels in one form
or another, either onsite or offsite. All combustion of fossil fuels produces
carbon dioxide, the primary greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming,
and also produces certain amounts of air pollution. Any reduction in HVAC
energy demand, therefore, produces environmental benefits.
Mechanical systems that are well-tuned to their building, their site, and their
climate can produce the most healthy, productive, and comfortable working and
living environments.
Mechanical HVAC systems last longer and operate more efficiently when they
are well-maintained, including measures such as frequent filter changes and
inspection and maintenance of the ductwork.

WAYS TO USE MECHANICAL SYSTEMS MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

Integrating the HVAC systems with each other is one of the most productive
ways to achieve efficiency gains. For example, the heating demand that would be
created by using cool, outside air for ventilation can be reduced through the use
of heat exchangers that transfer much of the heat from the outgoing exhaust air
to the incoming ventilation air.
The integration of HVAC systems with other building systems can also produce
efficiency gains. For example, building systems such as lighting, kitchens, or
heavy equipment produce significant amounts of heat that perhaps can be
harnessed for productive use in the HVAC systems.
Heating and cooling systems generally operate most efficiently when they are
operating at or near their capacity. Proper sizing of a system therefore becomes
very important to assure that the system will operate to its optimum efficiency.
Many rules of thumb for sizing do not take into account factors that may reduce
heating or cooling demand. For example, a conventional sizing analysis may not
consider the reduction in cooling demand achieved by daylighting, and therefore
would suggest a cooling system that is larger than necessary.
Ductwork systems can be a source of both unhealthy air and energy losses. To
assure healthy indoor air quality, ductwork should be designed to facilitate
inspection and service, and should be the subject of regular inspections. To
assure energy efficient operation, ductwork should be designed to be compatible
with blower capacity and should be well-sealed and insulated.
"Smart" controls offer numerous opportunities for more efficient HVAC
operations. Sensors that measure the amount of carbon dioxide in the return air
system can increase or decrease the amount of air brought in from outdoors to
meet the need for healthy indoor air. Similarly, sensors that measure outdoor
air conditions can increase cooling system efficiency by determining when an
increase in the incoming volume of cool outdoor air would lower the demand
placed upon the cooling system.


Greet1 Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Mechanical
98


FUTURE INNOVATIONS

The increased availability and sophistication of computer software will assist the
building designer in choosing an HVAC system that is the appropriate size, type,
and compatibility for the building, its site, and its climate.
"Smart" controls are likely to become more prevalent as a means of assuring
efficient HVAC system operations




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Mechanical 99



PRODUCT E-TECH

COMPOSlJlON COMPRESSOR, EVAPORATOR
DESCRPTlON HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER
COIL, AIR FAN, WATER
CIRCULATING PUMP, AND
EXPANSION DEVICE, CONTROLS
WASTE PRODUCTS
CRlSPAlRE CO.
COMPANY:
3570 AMERICAN DRIVE
ATLANTA GA 30341 TESTS.
(404) 458-6643
FAX (404) 458-6643




DlSTRl6UJOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS:




PRODUCT: HOMEOWNERS PACKAGE

FLOW RATE SHOWER HEAD, TWO
COMPOSlTlON
DESCRlPTlON KITTOSAVE WATER WITHTHE
AERATORS, AND A FLUSH MISER
EATHROOM APPLIANCES
.....................................................
~




WASTE PRODUCTS:
DOLPHIN ENGINEERING NONE
COMPANY:
34 SNARESEROOK CT
ORMOND BEACH FL 32174437 JESTS:
(904) 672-6666 (800) 284-9666
FAX (904) 672-0390




REMARKS EASY WAY TO LOWER WATER USE WITHOLIT
DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT
BIG INVESTMENTOR INCONVENIENCE




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Mechanical
100




PRODUCT LIVING AIR XL-I5

COMPOSlTlON, PURIFIES AIR BY INCREASING
DESCRIPTION. PORTABLE AIR PURIFYINGSYSTEM OZONE AND ION CONTENT
HANDLING SQUARE FOOTAGE UP TO
2500 SQUARE FEET
.,......,........ ...........................................................................................................


1
j. I



$ LIVING AIR
COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS: NONE
i 9199 CENTRAL AVENUE NE



I
i BLANE MN 55434 TESTS: CSA APPROVED INDEPENDENT
TESTING FOR MOLD AND
i (919) 859-1434
j BACTERIA
! FAX:




REMARKS: IMPROVES AIR QUALITY BY OXIDIZINGAND
DISTRIBUTOR: RUSS LEMACKS
IONIZING POLLUTANTS
5700 C SOUTH VALLEY CT.
27606
RALEIGH NC
(919) 8591434




PRODUCT: AIR FILTER

COMfOSITlON TIGHTLY WOVEN POLYESTER
CLEANS AIR USING A SYSTEM OF THREE
DESCRIPTION SCREEN
FILTERS


WASTE PRODUCTS: USED FILTERS
$ 4280 E RAINES ROAD
TN 38118 TESTS:




DISTRIBUTOR: INDEPENDENTDISTRIBUTOR REMARKS:
2122 ENTERPRISE RD
GREENSBORO NC 27406
(910) 271-6828




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Mecha iz ical 101




PRODUCT: AIR FILTERS

COMPOSITION. ALUMINUM MESH, CHARCOAL,
AIR FILTERS FOR AIR FILTRATION
D鈧琒CR/PT/ON.
ODOR FILTER
SYSTEMS


COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS OLD FILTERS
TRION INC.
PO BOX 760
SANFORD NC 27331-0760
TESTS
(919) 775-2201
FAX:




DISTRIBUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS: AIR FILTERING SYSTEMS FOR COMMERCIAL
AND RESIDENTIALAPPLICATIONS THAT ARE
COMPATIBLE WITH HVAC SYSTEMS




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
EZectricity
102


DIVISION ELECTRICITY
16

BACKGROUND

Although electricity is a recent arrival in
the scope of human history, humans have
managed in a very short period of time to
incorporate it into virtually every aspect of
their lives. Electricity powers lights,
televisions, stereos, and computers, it cooks
food, and it cools, and often heats, homes
and offices. The consumption of electricity
is expected to rise about twice as fast as
overall energy demand in the coming
decades.

The ready availability and the relatively
cheap cost of electricity have greatly
influenced the way humans construct
buildings. Electric heating, cooling, and
lighting have tended to cause designers to
make buildings that are more isolated from the outside environment, relying on
electrically powered mechanical systems rather than natural systems for light,
ventilation, and temperature control. Since the cost of electricity is virtually certain
to rise in the coming decades, humans must design new buildings that take
advantage of natural systems and use electricity more efficiently, and find ways to
retrofit existing buildings so they operate more efficiently.

The fact that electricity is usually generated at locations remote from the point of use
tends to make people unaware of the resources that are consumed in its production
and the means by which it is produced. Most electricity is produced by the
combustion of non-renewable fossil fuels, such as natural gas, petroleum, and coal.
The combustion of these resources produces air pollution (leading to acid rain,
smog, and global warming) and can produce byproducts (e.g., flyash from coal
combustion) that are disposal problems. Hydroelectric generation, once thought to
be 鈥渃lean,鈥? often damages river ecosystems through reservoir construction and
altered flow, and impedes the passage of important species of fish (such as salmon
and shad) that live most of their lives in the ocean but spawn in freshwater streams.
Nuclear energy, considered generally clean at the point of generation, poses serious
problems with respect to safety and disposal of wastes and byproducts.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Electricity 103

RESOURCES

coal
natural gas
petroleum
wind
solar energy
hydroelectric
nuclear

ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS

Because electricity is usually generated at a location remote from the point of use,
it is considered "clean" from the point of view of toxicity and indoor air quality.
Most electricity is generated from the combustion of fossil fuels, which are non-
renewable in that they cannot be replaced in any meaningful time frame.
The combustion of fossil fuels for the generation of electricity produces
numerous pollutants: carbon dioxide (a major greenhouse gas leading to global
warming); sulfur dioxide (a contributor to acid rain); oxides of nitrogen
(contributors to smog); and residues such as flyash from coal combustion, which
poses problems with disposal. The extraction of fossil fuels causes
environmental problems: habitat loss and pollution from surface mining;
wetlands and other habitat loss from oil and gas extraction.
As much as 70% of the energy released by fuels used to generate electricity is lost
as waste heat at the point of combustion. Another 3%is lost during distribution.
This leaves only 27% available at the point of use.

WAYS TO USE ELECTRICITY MORE ENVIRONMENTALLY

Design the building to maximize electrical efficiency, including: facilitate
daylighting; adequate insulation; proper sizing and location of windows; efficient
glazing systems; maximize natural ventilation and passive solar heating; control
infiltration; specify efficient heating and cooling systems; and use energy saving
landscaping. Regard mechanical systems as supplements, and design them to be
compatible with the use of natural systems.
Electrical utilities must build power plants with capacity sufficient to meet
"peak" demands. To the extent that demand can be timed to occur during "off-
peak" time periods (e.g., during the night), the construction of new power plants
can be avoided. For this reason, electrical utilities usually charge commercial
customers less per unit energy during off-peak periods. Buildings should be
designed to take advantage of lower off-peak charges.
Select materials that require less electricity to produce. For example, converting
bauxite to virgin aluminum is the most expensive and energy intensive

Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Electricity
104

fabrication process in the construction industry. Producing recycled aluminum
uses four percent of the fabrication energy of producing virgin aluminum and
creates five percent of the air pollution.
Lighting offers many opportunities for electricity conservation. The use of
electrical lighting increases electricity consumption in two ways: the electricity
used to power the light; the electricity used to remove from the building the heat
generated by the light. Use daylighting as extensively as possible; design electrical
lighting systems to meet specific tasks, using reasonable lighting levels; use
energy efficient electrical lighting fixtures (compact fluorescents, fluorescents,
high intensity discharge); use "smart" technologies such as occupancy sensors
and ambient light sensors.
Use electricity in ways that take advantage of its inherent characteristics.
Electricity is a very high grade energy source ,in that it can perform high
temperature or high concentration energy tasks such as lighting or motive
(moving) power. "Low grade" energy tasks such as space heating (in which the
task is to change the temperature of air by relatively few degrees) are more
efficiently handled by energy sources other than electricity, such as onsite
combustion.

FUTURE INNOVATIONS

Renewable sources of electrical generating capacity such as wind and solar energy
currently comprise a relatively small portion of overall electrical production, but
are likely to grow in the future. As humans begin to rely more upon these
renewable energy sources, generation of electricity will probably become more
decentralized.
"Smart" technologies, such as occupancy sensors and light level sensors will
become increasingly common in order to avoid wasting electricity.
Conservation will increasingly be regarded as a "source" of new electricity,
because the electricity made available through conservation is obtained at less
expense than electricity made available by constructing new generating capacity.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Electricity 105



PRODUCT: PHOTOELECTRICSMOKE DETECTORS

COMPOSlJlON PHOTOELECTRICEMISSIONS AS
DESCR/PT!ON NUCLEAR FREE SMOKE DETECTOR
COMPARED TO RADIOACTIVE
USING PHOTOELECTRICDETECTION
.............. ........., .................................................................................
(........ .
,
COMPANY: ECOWORKS WASTE PRODUCTS: NUCLEAR FREE
i 2326 PICKWICK RD
f BALTIMORE 21207
MD
TESTS:
(800) 466-9268
!;
$ FAX:

.............




DlSTRl8UTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS. CONCERNS OVER THE HEALTH EFFECTS OF
ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS HAVE GIVEN WAY
TO ALTERNATIVE PRODUCTS




PRODUCT: TOTAL HOME

DESCRlP TION: COMPOSlTlON.
A SYSTEM DESIGNEDTO INTEGRATE
SECURITY, TEMPERATURE, LIGHTING,
AND APPLIANCE CONTROLS

WASTE PRODUCTS:

55440
MINNEAPOLIS MN
TESTS:




DISTRlBUTOR INNOVATIVE SYSTEMS REMARKS A TOTAL HOME SYSTEM WHICH ALLOWS YOU
TO PROGRAM APPLIANCE ACTIVATION AND
9301 A MONROE
LIMITS ALONG WITH A SECURITY SYSTEM
CHARLOTTE NC 28270
(704) 847-7708 ~~~




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Electricity
106



PRODUCT: COMPACT FLUORESCENTS

COMPOS/T/ON COMPACT FLOURESCENT
D鈧琒CR/PT/ON: LIGHTBULB WHICH FITS INTO
FIXTURES
CONVENTIONAL LIGHT SOCKETS
............................................ .........................
.........................
~ ~




COMPANY: WASTE PRODUCTS:
PANASONIC
ONE PANASONIC WAY PANAZIP 4 A 4
SECUCUS NJ 07094 TESTS:
(201) 392-6833




DISTRISUTOR: FACTORY DIRECT REMARKS COMPACT FLUORESCENTS GIVE OFF ONLY
25% OF THE HEAT RADIATION AS
INCANDESCENT BULBS




PRODUCT: WATT STOPPER

D鈧琒CR/PT/ON; COMPOSfT/OM
SENSOR BASED LIGHTING SYSTEM



COMPANY WASTE PRODUCTS:

CA 95050 TESTS:

FAX: (4081988-5373
$




DISTRIBUTOR REMARKS DEPENDING ON SYSTEM, THE CALCULATED
CONCEPT LIGHTING SALES
PAYBACK PERIOD I 11-18 MONTHS
S
804-101 SALEM WOODS DR. -
RALEIGH NC 27815
(919) 8484882




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Glossary 107

*


Glossary of Terms
The authors would like to thank the following, whose glossaries were particularly
helpful in compiling our own:

Moore, Fuller Environmental Control Svstems: Heatinp. Cooling,
Lighting McGraw-Hill, Inc. (1993)

Harborwatch, Inc. PO Box 21655, Charleston, SC 29413-1655 (803)577-2103


acid rain -- Precipitation that is contaminated with acid due to sulfur dioxide and
oxides of nitrogen in the air.

active solar heat -- Thermal energy received from sunlight that is transferred by fans
or pumps for the forced distribution of heat.

biodegradable -- Able to be broken down by living organisms and retumed to a
previous state.

British thermal unit (Btu) -- 1 Watt = 3.412 Btus. The British thermal unit is a
measure of energy, equivalent to the amount of heat required to raise the
temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit, or equal to
approximately 252 calories. One Btu is roughly the equivalent of the amount
of energy released by burning a single match.

--
built environment The envelope or volume occupied by the outer walls and roof
of a building.

-- A substance known to cause cancer.
carcinogen

chemical sensitivitv -- A sickness caused by a reaction to synthetic chemicals. In a
building context, these chemicals may come from a number of sources such as
outgassing (release of gaseous chemicals from building materials into the
atmosphere) or residues from pesticide or solvent use. The sickness may
manifest itself in a range of forms including headache, joint pain, and
asthma. Chemical sensitivity differs from allergies, in that the term "allergy"
is usually used to describe an adverse reaction to naturally occurring
.
compounds.

chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) -- Chemicals used in the manufacture of many products
including some foam insulation. They are also present in some chemicals
used in mechanical cooling systems such as freon. CFCs have two significant
environmentally damaging characteristics. They are potent greenhouse gases,



Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Glossary
108

contributing to global warming, and they destroy the earth鈥檚 protective ozone
layer when they rise to the stratosphere.

cooline load -- A measure of the energy that must be expended by a building鈥檚
systems to cool the indoor to a desired temperature.

cumulative effects -- The combined environmental impacts that accumulate over
time and space from a series of similar or related individual actions,
contaminants, or projects; while an individual impact may be relatively
minor, its cumulative effect, when combined with others, can be severe.

davlighting -- The means by which daylight is brought into a building to either
-
supplement or replace electrical lighting in order to allow the occupants to
perform their tasks.

-- The sum of the energy, stated in British thermal units, required
-e
for the creation, harvest, manufacture, packaging, transport, and placement of
a building product in its final built position.

erosion -- Wearing away of rock or soil by the gradual detachment of soil or rock
fragments by water, wind, ice, and other mechanical and chemical forces.

exDanded foam -- Refers to the use of pressurized pentane gas to create a foam
product; not ozone-depleting, but contributes to ground level smog, and VOC
emissions are possible. Used for roofs, walls and ceilings.

extruded foam -- A foam product traditionally expanded with CFC-11; alternatives
are not yet commercially available; VOC emissions are possible.

formaldehvde -- A volatile organic compound off-gassed in paints, glue adhesives,
and laminates that can cause sickness and contribute to ground-level ozone
formation.

flat-tdate collector -- A solar device that transforms radiant energy into heat energy
by absorption. The heat is then transferred from the collector to a circulating
liquid or gas, such as air, water, oil or antifreeze, which stores the heat and
transmits it to its point of use.

fluorescent lamp -- This form of lighting constitutes approximately 70% of the
electrical light used in North America. Efficacy rates (the standard ratings of
lumens/input wattage) for fluorescent lamps range from 50-80 lm/w.; much
higher than that of incandescent bulbs. Not only does this result in energy
savings due to lighting, this also results in energy savings due to reduced
cooling loads.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Glossary 109

glazing -- A transparent covering usually made from glass or plastic used to admit
light through a window, door, skylight, or other opening.

gravwater -- Water drained from building systems such as dishwashers,
clotheswashers, sinks, and showers. Graywater usually requires some degree
of treatment before it can be reused because it is likely to contain soap,
contaminants from the kitchen, etc., but it does not include wastewater from
toilets. Today, we usually mix graywater and blackwater (sewage from toilets).
The potential uses for graywater are numerous, however, including
landscape irrigation, carwash, toilet flushing, and pool use.

groundwater recharpe -- The natural replenishment of the underground water table
by rainfall. Paved areas and elaborate drainage systems prohibit groundwater
recharge.

heat exchanger -- A mechanical system that allows the heat from outgoing interior
exhaust air to be transferred to incoming fresh, outdoor air. This is achieved
by constant fan-forced ventilation, using either flat-plate, or rotary
exchangers.

hvdrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) -- An alternative to CFCs, with an approximate
98% composition reduction in CFCs; however, they still damage the
stratospheric ozone layer.

incandescent lamu -- A lamp that produces light by directing electrical current
through a metallic medium. The efficiency of lamps is stated using an
efficacy rating (lumens/input wattage). For example, a 100-watt lamp that
produces 1,740 lumens has an efficacy of 1 . lumens per watt. The average
74
incandescent lamp typically falls in the 10-25 lumens per watt range.

Life Cycle Analvsis -- A methodology of quantitative assessment that determines the
relative environmental "pluses" and "minuses" of a product, over its
lifetime, on the topics of resource depletion, manufacture, installation
methods, and recyclability and/or reuse.

non-renewable resource -- A resource of which there are finite amounts in the
world, and of which there is no likelihood of replacing within a reasonable
time frame. Common ones are coal, natural gas, and petroleum.

operational energy -- The energy, stated in British thermal units, required to heat,
cool, light, and run any other systems in a building.

passive solar svstem -- A system that relies on the natural phenomena of energy
(radiation, convection, and conduction) for the transfer and storage of heat or
"coolness." Some basic elements of a passive solar system are south-facing



Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Glossary
110

glazing for solar collection and thermal mass for absorption, storage and
distribution.

PET -- Polyethylene terephthalate, or #1 plastic; this is the material of which most
soda bottles are made.

photovoltaic -- A mechanical solar radiation collection device, usually made of
silicon, that actively converts the sun鈥檚 energy into electricity using solar cells
or semiconductors. The electric current is then transmitted to a battery for
use or storage.

post-consumer content -- Refers to the percentage of the total content of a material.
that has passed through its end-usage as a consumer item and has been
recovered or diverted from the solid waste stream for the purpose of
recycling.

potable water -- Water that is considered to be of drinkable quality.

--- Polypropylene, or #5 plastic.
PP

pre-consumer content -- The percentage of the total content of a material that was
generated during the production of a product and that has been recovered or
diverted from the solid waste stream for the purpose of recycling, excluding
scrap materials, virgin content materials, or by-products generated from, and
commonly reused within, an original manufacturing process.

pS -- Polystyrene, or #6 plastic; commonly known as Styrofoam.

pvC -- Polyvinyl chloride, or #3 plastic; used to manufacture plastic piping.
recvclabilitv -- Technically, any material can be recycled if the amount of energy
consumed in the process is not a factor. For our purposes, recyclability means
any material that is in demand that requires less embodied energy to reuse
than to manufacture afresh from virgin materials. For materials listed in this
Directory, we were specifically interested in whether the product in question
incorporated recyclability in its design criteria.

--
recvcled content The percentage of the total content of a material comprised of
post-consumer content and pre-consumer content.

renewable enerm -- energy that is derived from inexhaustible sources such as solar,
wind, hydro, nuclear and geothermal.

R-value -- A measure of thermal resistance, indicating how effective a material is as
an insulator. R-value is measured in the hours needed for one Btu to flow
through one inch of the material when the temperature difference (from one

Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Glossary 111

side of the material to the other) is one degree Fahrenheit. Its units are hour-
square foot-degree FahrenheiUBtu-inch.

smart controls -- Controls for HVAC, lighting, and other systems that monitor
outdoor or indoor conditions (e.g., air temperature and quality, light levels) to
help systems run at their optimal levels, thereby reducing the overall
demand on the system.

septage -- The biological waste sludge and scum materials that are pumped from a
septic tank.

sustainable -- The Worldwatch Institute defines 鈥漵ustainable鈥? as 鈥漨eeting present
needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their
own needs.鈥? For example, wood harvested from a 鈥漵ustainable forest鈥? means
that the wood is derived from a forest managed in a manner so that the trees
harvested will be replaced at a rate that matches the rate of removal. In this
regard, the forest will continue producing wood for successive generations.

toxins -- Chemical substances that can cause harmful effects on humans; toxins
include heavy metals such as cadmium, lead, and mercury, as well as organic
compounds like petroleum products, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and
polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

U-value -- U-value is the overall coefficient of heat transmission. It is a measure of
the rate of heat flow through any given combination of materials, air layers,
and air spaces. It is equal to the reciprocal of the sum of all resistances (R). In
other words, the U-value can be calculated for a particular wall, roof, or floor
system by finding the resistances (R-value) of each of its materials, its air
layers, and its internal air spaces, then adding all of these resistances and
finding the reciprocal. The lower the U-value, the lower the heat loss or the
higher the insulating value. The units are Btu/hour/square foot/degree
Fahrenheit.

vapor retarder -- a material or coating, impermeable to moisture, designed to
impede passage of water or water vapor.

volatile organic comuounds (VOCs) -- VOCs are chemical compounds common in
many building products: solvents in paints and other coatings; wood
preservatives; strippers and household cleaners; adhesives in particleboard,
fiberboard, and some plywoods; and foam insulation. When released, VOCs
can contribute to the formation of smog and can cause respiratory tract
problems, headaches, eye irritations, nausea, damage to the liver, kidneys,
and central nervous system, and possibly even cancer.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Glossary
112

water aualitv -- A term that reflects the condition of water which is affected by
natural processes and human activities; water quality means different things
to different people, depending on what they wish to do with the water.




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Resources Consulted 113

.
CONSULTED
RESOURCES

Alternative Energy Sourcebook
Real Goods Trading Corporation
966 Mazzoni Street, Ukiah CA 95482-3471 (704) 468-9292 (800) 762-7325


ARCAT, A Directory of Over 6,400 Building Product Manufacturers
The Architect's Catalog, Inc.
The Brick Walk - Suite A-12, 1275 Post Road, Fairfield CT 06430 (203) 256-1600
(800) 329-7228


BJ Harris Environmental Product Directory
A database for environmentally friendly building products
Stafford Harris, Inc.
1916 Pike Place, #705, Seattle, WA 98101-1056 (206)-682-4042


Designing With Vision, Public Building Guidelines for the 21st Century
Bonneville Power Administration, Seattle City Light, Seattle Department of
Parks and Recreation
1992


1992-93 Directory of North Carolina Manufacturing Firms
North Carolina Department of Economic & Community Development
Business/Industry Development Division
430 N. Salisbury Street, Raleigh NC 27603 (919) 733-4886


Environmental Control Systems: Heating Cooling Lighting
Fuller Moore
McGraw-Hill, Inc.
New York 1993


The Environmental Resource Guide
A collection of detailed material assessments, articles, and case studies
connecting environmental awareness with building construction.
The American Institute of Architects
1735 New York Ave, NW, Washington DC 20006 (202) 626-7331 (800) 365-
ARCH



Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Resources Consulted
114

Environmentally Responsible Building Products
National Park Service
Denver Service Center 1992
PO Box 25287, Denver CO 80225-0287 (303) 969-2130


Guide to Resource Efficient Building Elements (GREBE)
A detailed listing of resource-efficient building materials. Especially strong in
the area of alternatives to conventional wood products.
Center for Resourceful Building Technology (CRBT)
PO Box 3866, Missoula MT 59806 (406) 549-7678


The Healthy House
In-depth look at the construction of a "healthy house" especially with respect to
the chemically sensitive. Chapters are broken down into stages of building (i.e.,
planning, location, etc.) and builPing components (Le., foundation systems,
steel framing, windows and doors, etc.) Good lists of organizations and
suppliers.
John Bower
Carol Communications 1989


Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings (8th ed.)
Benjamin Stein and John S. Reynolds
John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1992


New Energy from Old Buildings
The Preservation Press 1981
National Trust for Historic Preservation


North Carolina Manufacturers of Recycled Products, June 1994
North Carolina Office of Waste Reduction
3825 Barrett Drive, Raleigh NC 27609 (800) 763-0136 or (919) 571-4100


Recycled Product Directory
Clean Washington Center
2001 Sixth Avenue, Suite 2700, Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 464-7040




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Resources Consulted 115

The Sourcebook for Sustainable Design
Extensive listings in CSI format. A useful resource, especially for architects and
specifiers. Less descriptive information than GREBE.
Architects for Social Responsibility/Boston Society of Architects
52 Broad Street, Boston MA 02109-4301 (617) 951-1433




USEFUL SOURCES FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

The authors would like to thank Environmental Building News for their help in
our efforts to educate individuals about sustainability. This bibliography consists
largely of a compilation of their sources. All of the document entries that contain a
listed price may be ordered by calling (800)257-7300.


ENERGY

Builder鈥榮 Foundation Handbook
Very good reference for builders on foundation design. Published by the
Department of Energy. Good tables on recommended levels of foundation
insulation. Document Order No. DE9101 6821 1991 ($30)
John Carmody, Jeff Rey Christian, and Kenneth Labs
National Technical Information Service
52858 Port Royal Road, Springfield VA 22161 (703) 487-4600


CHBA Builder鈥檚 Manual: R-2000
Thorough coverage of moisture control, ventilation issues, and innovative
superinsulated construction details. Clear and useful illustrations. 1989 ($55)
Canadian Home Builders鈥? Association
150 Laurier Avenue W, Suite 150, Ottawa ON KIP 5j4 Canada (613) 230-3060


Climatic Design: Energy-Efficient Building Principles and Practices 1983
One of the classics on energy-efficient and climate-responsive design. (out of
print)
Donald Watson, FAIA, Kenneth Labs
McGraw-Hill, Inc.
Monterey Avenue, Blue Ridge, Summit PA 17294-0850 (800) 822-8138




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Resources Consulted
116


Concepts and Practice of Architectural Daylighting
Somewhat technical; a thorough introduction to the basics. 1991 ($30.95)
Fuller Moore
Van Nostrand Reinhold
115 Fifth Avenue, New York NY 10003 (212) 254-3232


Design with Climate: A Bioclimatic Approach to Architectural Regionalism
The classic text providing principles for incorporating climatic variables into
building design and siting. 1992 ($29.95)
Victor Olgyay
Van Nostrand Reinhold
115 Fifth Avenue, New York NY 10003 (212) 254-3232


Energy Design Update
The leading resource for news and developments relating to energy-efficient
residential design and construction. Emphasis on products. ($157/year)
Ned Nisson
Cutter Information Corporation
37 Broadway, Arlington MA 02174 (617) 648-8700 (617) 684-1950 (fax)


Energy Source Directory: A Guide to Products Used in Energy Efficient Construction
Detailed listings, with photos, of hundreds of products used in energy-efficient
construction. New for 鈥?93: icons identify products with recycled content and
those that use alternatives to CFCs. ($175/year)
Iris Communications, Inc.
258 East 10th Avenue, Suite E, Eugene OR 97401-3284 (503) 383-9353 (503) 484-
1645 (fax)


Low-E Glazing Design Guide
Clear and detailed technical explanation of low-e glazing and how to use it to
best advantage. 1991 (34.95)
Timothy E. Johnson
Butterworth-Heinemann
80 Montvale Avenue, Stoneham MA 02180 (617) 438-4864




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Resources Consulted 117

HEALTHY INDOOR AIR QUALITY

Healing Environments: Your Guide to Indoor Well-Being
M h y good ideas about the physiological and psycho~ogicalaspects of buildings.
2993 ($9.95)
Carol Venolia
Celestial Arts
PO Box 7327, Berkeley CA 94707 (510) 559-1600


Indoor Air Quality and HVAC Systems
Comprehensive discussion of the relationship between HVAC equipment and
indoor air quality. Primary focus is on commercial buildings. 2993 ($59.95)
David W. Bearg
Lewis Publishers/CRC Press, Inc.
2000 Corporate Boulevard, NW, Boca Raton FL 33431 (407) 994-0555


Indoor Air Review
The newspaper of the Indoor Air Quality industry. Newspaper-format
periodical includes sections on lead, asbestos, and radon. Monthly newsletter:
$72 /year
Dennis Melamed
IAQ Publications, Inc.
4520 East-West Highway, Suite 610, Bethesda MD 20814 (301) 913-0115 (301)
913-0119 (fax)


RESOURCE-EFFICIENTPRODUCTS & MATERIALS

A Straw Bale Primer
Down-to-earth how-to about straw bales.
S.O. MacDonald 1991 ($10)
Orien MacDonald
PO Box 58, Gila NM 88038


Building with Junkand Other Good Stuff: A Guide to Home Building and
Remodeling Using Recycled Materials
Lots of good ideas for using scrounged and salvaged materials to build a house.
Geared towards owner-builders. 2990 ($19.95)
Jim Broadstreet
Loompanics Unlimited
Box 1197, Port Townsend WA 98368




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Resources Consulted
118

Environmental Construction Outfitters
A catalog
44 Crosby Street, New York NY, 10012 (800) 238-5008


McRecycle USA Program
Region-specific database available.
McDonalds Corporation, Environmental Affairs Department
McDonalds Plaza, Oak Brook IL 60521 (708) 575-3000


Plastered Straw Bale Construction
An overview of the background and practical issues surrounding straw-bale
construction. 2992
David Bainbridge, Athena Steen, and Bill Steen
The Canelo Project
HCR Box 324, Canelo AZ 85611 (602) 455-5548


Recycled Building Products
American Recycling Market
PO Box 577, Ogdensburg NY 13669 (800) 267-0707 or (315) 471-3258


The Earthbuilder鈥檚 Encyclopedia
Comprehensive reference on the tools, techniques, and materials used for
adobe and rammed-earth construction. 2989 ($20.35)
Joseph M. Tibbets
Southwest Solaradobe School
PO Box 153, Bosque NM 87006 (505) 252-1382


The Environmental Catalogue & Consumer鈥檚 Guide to a Safe Earth
Easy-to-use large-format consumer catalogue of environmentally friendly
products. Filled with black-and-white photos and short captions, the products
are categorized under such headings as building materials, automobiles, and
personal care products. 2990
Bruce Anderson
Prentice Hall Press


The Official Recycled Products Guide
American Recycling Markets, Inc.
PO Box 577, Ogdensburg NY 13669 (800) 267-0707




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Resources Consulted 119

The Wood Users duide
Listing of alternatives to tropical hardwoods; a good starting point. 1992 ($7.50)
Pamela Wellner and Eugene Dickey
Rainforest Action Network
450 Sansome, Suite 700, San Francisco CA 94111 (415) 398-4404


URBAN PLANNINGlLAND USElCOMMUNITIES

A Pattern Language: Towns-Buildings-Construction
One of the design classics, illustrating patterns that work on all scales, from the
reading nook to the whole city.
Christopher Alexander, Sara Ishikawa, and Murray Silverstein
Oxford University Press


Design with Nature
1991 ($57.95)
Ian L. McHarg
John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
605 3rd Avenue, New York NY 10158 (212) 850-6000


Land Use Strategies for More Livable Places: A Guidebook for Local Governments
Clear and concise guidelines for land use planning to reduce automobile use.
California emphasis, but nationwide applicability. Has sample drafts of a
resolution and other documents for use by local governments or community
groups. 1992 ($19.95)
Steve Weissman and Judy Corbett
Local Government Commission
909 12th Street, Suite 205, Sacramento CA 95814 (916) 448-1198 (916) 448-8246
(fax)


Sustainable Communities: A New Design Synthesis for Cities, Suburbs, and Towns
Essays by these two leading planners and several others provide a good
overview to the theory of ecologically appropriate land use. 1986 ($25)
Sim Van der Ryn and Peter Calthorpe
Sierra Books
2034 Fillmore Street, San Francisco CA 94115 (415) 291-1600




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Resources Consulted
120

WASTE MANAGEMENT

Construction Materials Recycling Guidebook
Innovative Waste Management
(612) 432-7038


Earth-Wise Builders: Resource Efficient Building
A good resource for formulating a reuse/salvagelrecycling plan. Particularly
interesting is the information regarding construction job-site recycling.
Metro, Solid Waste Department
600 NE Grand Avenue, Portland OR 97232-2736 (503) 797-1650


WATER CONSERVATION IN SITE AND LANDSCAPE DESIGN

Cooling Our Communities: A Guidebook On Tree Planting and Light Colored
Surfacing (1992)
US Environmental Protection Agency
Office of Policy Analysis, Climate Change Division, 401 M Street, S.W. (PM 221),
Washington D.C. 20460 (202) 260-8825


Design for Human Ecosystems: Landscape, Land U e and Natural Resources
s,
Uses highly detailed case studies to illustrate principles of ecologically sensitive
land use planning. 1985 ($29.95)
John Tillman Lyle
Van Nostrand Reinhold
115 Fifth Avenue, New York NY 10003 (212) 254-3232


Energy Conserving Site Design
A collection of thirteen articles by various authors on landscape and land-use
design. Fairly technical, with lots of useful information. 1984 ($24.60)
E. Gregory McPherson, Ed.
American Society of Landscape Architects
1733 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20009 (202) 686-2752


Landscaping with Wildflowers: An Environmental Approach to Gardening
Well-illustrated book on native plant gardening. Written for the homeowner.
Includes species recommendations for different climates. 1992 ($18.95)
Jim Wilson
Houghton Mifflin Company
2 Park Street, Boston MA 02108 (617) 725-5000



Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Resources Consulted 121



Water-Efficient Technologies: A Catalog for the ResidentiallLight Commercial
Sector
A complete guide to water-conserving plumbing fixtures and irrigation
systems. Photos, detailed product descriptions, listings of product reviews that
have appeared, and addresses for each product listed. 1991 ($25)
Colin Laird
Rocky Mountain Institute
1739 Snowmass Creek Road, Snowmass CO 81654 (303) 927-3851 (303) 927-4178
(fax)


Xeriscape Gardening: Water Conservation for the American Landscape
Comprehensive review of xeriscape (low water-use landscaping) principles,
strategies, and region-by-region species recommendations. Useful for
professionals and homeowners.
Connie Ellefson, Tom Stephens, and Doug Welsh
Macmillan Publishing Co.
866 Third Avenue, New York NY 10022 (212) 702-2120 (212) 605-9351 (fax)




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Additional Information
122




SUGGESTED QUESTIONS OBTAINING ADDITIONAL
FOR INFORMATION

What is the expected operable life of the product?
1.

How efficiently does the product operate, in terms of the amount of energy
2.
required to power it?

With what frequency does the product need to be maintained, and what level
3.
of time and expense can be expected for maintenance?

What amount of energy is embodied in the product?
4.

What portion of the product was made using recycled materials, and of that
5.
recycled portion, what portions are pre-consumer and post-consumer?

Is the product reusable or recyclable in whole or in part?
6.

7. For products or portions of products that cannot be reused or recycled, does the
disposal of the product pose any significant difficulties or risks?

What portion of the manufacture of the product uses renewable resources, and
8.
what portion uses non-renewable resources?

What sorts and amounts of pollution (noise, air, water, etc.) are produced
9.
during the manufacture or installation of the product?

10. Are waste products generated during the manufacture of the product, and if so,
what is done with them?

11. What effect does the manufacture and use of the product have on world
resources and the world environment, including issues such as habitat
destruction, global warming, and destruction of stratospheric ozone?

12. What effect does the product have on indoor air quality?




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Company Index 123



COMPANY INDEX

Company Product Page
Steel framing..........................................................
Advanced Framing Systems 30
AFM Enterprises. Inc. Sealers. polishers and waxes. pain ........................... 64
Enkadrain ..............................................................
Akzo Industrial Systems 16
Energy seal ............................................................
American Rockwool 44
Amofoam ...............................................................
hoc0 44
Dishwater .............................................................
Ask0 33
Acfoam ..................................................................
Atlas 45
Biolet toilet ............................................................
Biolet 77
Pacific Waterbornefinishes ......................................
Bonakemi 64
Salvaged building materials....................................
Building Supply Recycling Center 13
Aqua Fleck paint ....................................................
California Products Corp. 65
Concrete incorporating flyash..................................
Capital City Ready Mix Concrete 22
Brick ......................................................................
Cherokee Brick 26
Powerbond .............................................................
Collins and Aikman 65
Mulch ....................................................................
Conweb Fibers 16
Wall board ........................ ;.................................... 66
Coreguard
Insulation .............................................................. 45
Cotton Insulation Products
E-Tech water heater ................................................
Crispaire Co. 99
Storm water drainage pipes ....................................
Crumpler Plastic Pipe. Inc. 17
Brick nuggets .........................................................
Cunningham Brick Co., Inc. 26
Dennyfoil ...............................................................
Denny Products 46
Home water saving packages ..................................
Dolphin Engineering 99
Earthcare Products. Inc. Plastic lumber ........................................................ 17
Plastic lumber ........................................................
Earthcare Products. Inc. 35
Photoelectric smoke detectors...................................
Ecoworks 105
Enertia houses ........................................................
Enertia Building Systems 91
...
Arttfrctal Slate ........................................................
Eternit 46
Fireplace mantels ....................................................
Fiberstone Quarries 77
Durat ext ................................................................
Fiberstone Quarries. Inc. 27
Fiber-cement shingles ..............................................
Fibrechem Co. 47
Forbo Industries. Inc. Marmoleum ........................................................... 66
Phenoseal ...............................................................
Gloucester Co. 47


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Company Index
124

Goodwin Heart Pine Co. Salvaged wood ....................................................... 35
Salvaged building materials.................................... 13
Habitat for Humanity
Beam and log framing ............................................ 36
Harmony Exchange
Polywood ............................................................... 36
Heartwood International
Hydrocote lacquers ................................................. 67
Highland Hardware
Exterior 440 structural board ................................. 67
Homasote
Tups stress-skin panels ........................................... 48
Homasote
Bedspreads and draperies........................................ 88
Homespun Fabrics & Draperies
$-way floor decking ................................................ 68
Homosote
Total home systems ................................................ 105
Honeywell
Image carpets ......................................................... 68
Image
3-D Panel System .................................................. 30
Insteel Construction Systems
Fireplaces and chimney systems .............................. 78
Isokem
Kimex Int . Technologies. Inc. Domestic solar systems ........................................... 91
Septic Helper .......................................................... 83
Krane Products
Laticrete Ind., Inc. Laticrete sealants .................................................... 69
Carpet .................................................................... 69
Lee Carpets
Hartex ................................................................... 70
Legget and Platt
Living Air XL-15 air system .................................. 100
Living Air
Cascade toilet ......................................................... 78
Mansfield Plumbing Products
Doors and Windows............................................... 56
Marvin Doors
Microflush toilet ..................................................... 79
Microphor
Mobil Chemical Co. Trex Wood-Polymer Composite.............................. 37
Open plan systems ................................................. 88
Modular Office Design
Autoclaved Cellular Concrete .................................. 22
North American Cellular Concrete
Air filter ................................................................. 100
NSA
Waterfilters ........................................................... 84
NSA
Old Fashioned Milk Paint Co. Milk paints ............................................................ 70
Straw bales .............................................................
Out on Bale Ltd . 92
Air-Krete................................................................ 48
Palmer
Seal ........................................................................ 49
Palmer
Compact Fluorescents ............................................. 106
Panasonic
Retroflect panels ..................................................... 51
Parsec
Thermo-Bite........................................................... 49
Parsec
Thermo-Bite tape ................................................... 50
Parsec
Vapo-Brite............................................................. 50
Parsec


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Company Index 125

Avanti. Newport. Citadel doors and windows .........56
Peachtree Doors. Inc:
Armstone floor tile.................................................. 71
Penna Grain Products
Mulch ....................................................................
Phoenix Recycling 18
Timbers and millwork .............................................
Pioneer Millworks 37
Septic pipe system ..................................................
Plastic Tubing. Inc. 18
Ready Mixed Concrete Co. Concrete incorporating flyash.................................. 23
Recycled Paints. Inc. Recycled paints....................................................... 71
Rubber Polymer Co. Rub-r-wall ............................................................. 51
Plant and pet care produds .................................... 19
Safer Products
Copper m鈥檆ket water heater ..................................... 92
Sage Advance Corp.
Waterproofing system ............................................. 52
Sealoflex
Auro varnishes, waxes. lacquers, pints ...................72
Sinan Co.
Solar water heaters ................................................. 93
Solar Development. Inc.
Cellulose................................................................. 52
Southem Cellulose
Clay tile ................................................................. 72
Stoneware
Solar water heating appliances ................................ 93
Sun Family
RF-12 refrigerant ................................................... 84
Sun Frost
Suncoast Industries Mfg . Insulation .............................................................. 53
Fresource solar water heater.......... .......................... 94
Sunquest ~




Solar equipment ..................................................... 94
Sunquest
Lifemaster 200 paints ............................................. 73
The Glidden Company
Recycled Paints ...................................................... 73
The Green Paint Co.
Heart wood pine..................................................... 38
The Joinery Co.
Trion. Inc. Air filter ................................................................. 101
The Silent Floor ...................................................... 38
Trus Joist h4acMillan
Cushion tiles .......................................................... 74
Turtle Plastics
Toilet ..................................................................... 79
Universal-Rundle
W.H. Maze Co. Nails....................................................................... 39
Toilet .....................................................................
Water Conservation Systems 80
Flushmate toilet ..................................................... 80
Water Control Ind .
Watt Stopper lighting system................................. 106
Watt Stopper
SERP refrigerator ................................................... 85
Whirlpool
Insulated panel ....................................................... 95
Winter Panel Corp.
Plastic lumber ........................................................ 39
Yemm and Hart
Recycled rubber pavers ............................................ 74
Yemm and Hart
Zam.Inc. Plastic recycling containers ..................................... 19


Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
Company Index
126

NOTES:




Green Building Products and Materials Resource Directory
127


MATERIALS RESOURCE DIRECTORY PRODUCT ENTRY FORM

If you would like your building product to be included in the next printing
of this Directory, or know of ones that meet the criteria for this document,
please fill out the form below and send it to the North Carolina Recycling
Association, 7330 Chapel Hill Rd, Suite 207, Raleigh, NC 27607.
Help us help you be a part of constructing a sustainable future.

PRODUCT NAME:
DESCRIPTION OR USE:
COMPANY NAME:
Address:

Number of Years in Business:
ENERGY
Operating Efficiency:
(r-value, electricity savings, resources conserved)
Embodied Energy:
Installation Method:
RECYCLABILITY
Product Designed to be Recycled (circle one): YES NO
% Pre-consumer Content:
% Post-consumer Content:
% Total Recycled Content

ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS
Material Composition:
Waste By-Products Created During Production:
Ofi Gases Released During Production:
Performed Test or Code Requirements Satisfied:
DISTRIBUTOR CONTACT (closest to Raleigh)
Name:
Address:
Phone:
REMARKS

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